Peregrine Bird Tours
Bird Tours
Peregrine Bird Tours

Thailand Tour Report

PEREGRINE BIRD TOURS


THAILAND


6th - 27th March 2015

TOUR REPORT


The ancient Buddhist Kingdom of Thailand is simply a superb birding destination, we saw, not recorded, but saw, a staggering 464 species of birds, which included no less than 45 species of waders, 10 species of nocturnal birds, all seen well, no less than 19 different species of woodpeckers, all 6 species of superb broadbills that occur in Central and Northern Thailand. We also observed more than our fair share of difficult to find species, such as Rufous-bellied Eagle, Scaly-breasted Partridge, Siamese Fireback, Mrs Hume's Pheasant, Watercock, Eurasian Woodcock, Asian Dowitcher, Nordmann's Greenshank, Red-necked Phalarope, Pallas's Gull, Moustached Hawk-Cuckoo, Coral-billed Ground-Cuckoo, White-fronted Scops-Owl, Hodgson's Frogmouth, Rusty-naped Pitta, Dark-sided Thrush, both Lesser and White-browed Shortwings, Rufous-browed Flycatcher, White-bellied Redstart, White-tailed Robin and Large Scimitar-Babbler. We also saw several endangered species, which included Spot-billed Pelican, Chinese Egret, Milky Stork, Malaysian and White-faced Plovers, Spoon-billed Sandpiper and Giant Nuthatch. The wetlands along Gulf of Siam hold the greatest concentration of egrets, terns, waders and storks, anywhere in the world and the diversity of species and shear numbers of wetland birds, is greater than anywhere else on the planet. Vagrants add spice to any tour and our sighting of Paddyfield Warbler at Chiang Saen, was the third record for Thailand, and the first sight record for Thailand, the two previous records, were birds that had been caught in mist-nets. We also very much enjoyed watching a Common Shelduck and a Mallard, both of which, are rare vagrants to Thailand. Mammal highlights included Golden Jackal, Crab-eating Mongoose and Banded Langur. Add to this extremely polite, welcoming, and friendly local people, food second to none, and an excellent local guide, Nick Upton was extremely professional and hard working, a great birder and also great fun, all of this combined together, to make our tour to Thailand, extremely rewarding and thoroughly enjoyable.

An overnight flight from Melbourne had us arriving at Bangkok Airport, just as it was getting light. We had a few hours to kill before our onward flight to Chiang Mai, in the far north. So we had a light breakfast and enjoyed some birding from a restaurant inside the airport terminal, which overlooked a small courtyard, of gardens with neatly planted hedgerows and palm trees. During the next couple of hours we enjoyed watching White-throated Kingfisher, Feral Pigeon, both Red-collared and Zebra Doves, Pied Fantail, Oriental Magpie-Robin, both Common and White-vented Mynas, Streak-eared Bulbul and both House and Eurasian Tree Sparrows. As well as the surprise find of a White-throated Fantail, a rather bizarre place, to observe this species, but clearly that was what the bird was.

We then took a short flight to Chiang Mai, in the far north of Thailand, where we were met by our local guide Nick Upton. The atmosphere at Chiang Mai was very hazy, it was the end of the dry season, and this is traditionally the time when the local people do some burning off. It remained hazy for the next 10 days, during the whole of the time we were in the far north of Thailand. From Chiang Mai, we drove due north and as we were driving through the town, roadside birds included Spotted Dove, Red-whiskered Bulbul and Ashy Woodswallow. A spot of roadside birding close to the village of Pang Makham Pom, produced good scope views of a splendid Banded Bay Cuckoo and an Indian Roller, we saw small flocks of Striated Swallows, as several Cook's Swifts flew overhead.

On arriving at our destination of Doi Ang Khang, we drove to a bird-feeding station at the Kings Project. As we arrived a Crested Goshawk flew above us, then we settled down at the bird-feeding station, on the edge of the forest. Our guide placed meal-worms on the ground, and we just sat back and watched the shyest denizens of the forest floor, descend on the hapless meal-worms. The next hour or so was some of the most enjoyable birding I have ever experienced. New birds included Olive-backed Pipit, Grey Wagtail, Mountain Bulbul, a superb male Rufous-bellied Niltava, Hill Blue-flycatcher, a young male Siberian Blue Robin, White-rumped Shama, the usually incredibly skulking White-tailed Robin, the very uncommon Streaked Wren-Babbler showed very well, as did the stunning Silver-eared Mesia, Blue-winged Minla and a stunning male Black-throated Sunbird. However, the species that really stole the show, was a brilliant pair of Rusty-naped Pittas, which we saw incredibly well. As we drove back to our resort, we stopped for a Blue Whistling-Thrush and on our arrival at our resort, we were greeted in the carpark, by a pair of White Wagtails. Today we also saw our first mammal of the tour, a Northern Treeshrew.

The whole of the following day was spent birding in and around Doi Ang Khang, predominantly birding the high forested ridges, near the border with Myanmar. We enjoyed a remarkable day, observing almost all of the regional specialities. We found Oriental Honey-buzzard, Eastern Buzzard, a female Asian Emerald Cuckoo, Barn Swallow, both Long-tailed and Short-billed Minivets, Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrike, flocks of Crested Finchbills, Striated, Brown-breasted. Sooty-headed and Flavescent Bulbuls, Chestnut-bellied Rock-Thrush, Black-breasted Thrush, Hill Prinia, Yellow-streaked, Two-barred, Buff-barred, Yellow-browed and Hume's Warblers, Little Pied and Verditer Flycatchers, Siberian Rubythroat, a beautiful male Daurian Redstart, the even more stunning White-capped Redstart, Grey Bushchat, White-crested and White-browed Laughingthrushes, the magnificent Scarlet-faced Liocichla, White-browed Scimitar-Babbler, the stunning Blyth's Shrike-Babbler, Spectacled Barwing, Grey-cheeked Fulvetta, Dark-backed Sibia, Japanese Tit and the very beautiful Yellow-cheeked Tit, behaved splendidly for us. We also found Chestnut-vented Nuthatch, both Oriental and Japanese White-eyes, Brown, Long-tailed and Grey-backed Shrikes, Ashy Drongo, a large flock of Common Rosefinches and the very uncommon Spot-winged Grosbeak. As it got dark we did a little spot-lighting and were rewarded with great looks at a grey morph Collared Scops-Owl and a superb Brown Wood-Owl. As we were spot-lighting, we were treated to a tremendous spectacle, as the whole valley was filled with literally many hundreds of fireflies, the whole valley was literally lit up like a Christmas tree! Today we also enjoyed another species of mammal, the delightful Pallas's Squirrel.

We spent the following morning birding in the same area; a Golden-throated Barbet flew into a tree right next to us, a Stripe-breasted Woodpecker also flew into a nearby tree, we greatly admired a pair of Orange-bellied Leafbirds, a Rufous-backed Sibia showed particularly well, we enjoyed good close looks at the delightful Spot-breasted Parrotbill, we saw both male and female Maroon Oriole very well, and a Burmese Shrike rounded the morning off perfectly.

In the afternoon, we drove to our next resort, at the foot of Doi Lang, where we would stay for the next four nights. Later in the afternoon we drove up Doi Lang and enjoyed our first day of birding on the mountain. It produced a plethora of colourful tropical birds. A Crested Serpent-Eagle perched in a large tree, a superb male Mrs. Hume's Pheasant, was observed feeding along the roadside, an Oriental Turtle-Dove foraged on the track ahead of us, and a male Asian Koel flew across the track. One of the highlights of the tour was a female Hodgson's Frogmouth sat on a nest, at eye-level. Other birds included a fine Lesser Yellownape, climbing up the side of a tree, a Large Cuckoo-shrike perched in a nearby tree, a Rufescent Prinia scolded us from the undergrowth, a Slaty-backed Flycatcher popped into view, a White-gorgeted Flycatcher was greatly admired, as was the equally attractive Ultramarine Flycatcher and a Grey-headed Canary-Flycatcher, flitted around in the canopy. At a feeding-station, established by the rapidly growing army of bird photographers in Thailand, we enjoyed super close looks at the beautiful Slaty-blue Flycatcher, the splendid Silver-cheeked Laughingthrush, and best of all, a female of the rarely observed White-bellied Redstart. We also encountered a small flock of unobtrusive Black-throated Tits, a few Fire-capped Tits, a wonderful Streaked Spiderhunter and a very smart looking Lesser Racket-tailed Drongo. On the drive back to our resort we observed Eastern Cattle Egret and Common Kestrel.

We spent the whole of the following day, birding on Doi Lang, which once again, yielded a huge number of new birds for us. They included an adult of the rarely encountered, Rufous-bellied Eagle, a stunning Mountain Hawk-Eagle, the huge Mountain Imperial-Pigeon, a couple of Greater Coucals, a diminutive Grey-capped Pygmy-Woodpecker, a striking pair of Grey-chinned Minivets, a Black-crested Bulbul, an Aberrant Bush-Warbler was very kind to us, and uncharacteristically, showed very well for us and we found three new species of phylloscopus warblers, Chinese, Blyth's and Davison's Leaf-Warblers. Other new birds included a fine Bianchi's Warbler, the stunning Rufous-gorgeted Flycatcher, a beautiful male Sapphire Flycatcher, the decidedly uncommon Pale Blue Flycatcher, a striking Himalayan Bluetail, a splendid Rusty-cheeked Scimitar-Babbler, a few Grey-headed Parrotbills, a Velvet-fronted Nuthatch, a Hume's Treecreeper, a delightful Slender-billed Oriole, Bronzed Drongo, a flock of Scaly-breasted Munias and best of all, the extremely range-restricted Giant Nuthatch. On the drive back to our resort, we observed the first of many, Chinese Pond-Herons. We also added one more species of mammal, the very attractive Western Striped Squirrel.

The following morning we birded a different section of Doi Lang, and once again, found plenty of new birds to look at. They included an immature Grey-faced Buzzard, a very fine Great Barbet, a rather manic Bay Woodpecker, a very beautiful Long-tailed Broadbill, Black-winged Cuckoo-shrike, several Scarlet Minivets, a Mountain Tailorbird, a characteristically skulking Radde's Warbler, a striking Siberian Stonechat, a male Pied Bushchat, a few Whiskered Yuhinas, a Hair-crested Drongo and a surprisingly obliging Pygmy Wren-Babbler, which showed very well indeed. Also this morning, we were watching a flock of Barn Swallows flying around a rice paddy, half way up Doi Lang. Some of them flew down to a patch of mud and started to collect it in their bills. They flew off, to some nearby small, simple huts, where there was up to six nests being built. This is one of only a handful of records of the Barn Swallow, nesting in Thailand. The vast majority of Barn Swallows are winter visitors to Thailand.

In the afternoon, we birded an area of farmland along the edge of the Kok River, at Thaton. Here we found Little Egret, a superb and very close, male Pied Harrier, which was greatly appreciated by everyone, we also saw Black-shouldered Kite, White-breasted Waterhen, Eurasian Moorhen, a splendid Ruddy-breasted Crake, several Greater Painted-snipe, a large flock of Oriental Pratincoles, a nesting pair of Small Pratincoles, Red-wattled Lapwing, Little Ringed Plover, Pintail Snipe, Green Sandpiper, Common Kingfisher, a couple of unusually obliging Baikal Bush-Warblers, Oriental Reed-Warbler, Dusky Warbler, Chestnut-capped and Yellow-eyed Babblers, Black Drongo, Racket-tailed Treepie, Black-collared Starling and Baya Weaver.
We spent the whole of the following day birding in the wetlands around Chiang Saen. We saw huge numbers of birds, throughout the day. New birds for the trip came thick and fast and included large numbers of Little Grebes, a few Great Cormorants, good numbers of Great Egrets, a couple of Intermediate Egrets, large numbers of impressive Grey Herons, a few Purple Herons, lots of Asian Openbills, large flocks of Lesser Whistling-Ducks, a couple of Northern Shovellers, large flocks of Indian Spot-billed Ducks, a single Garganey, four Ferruginous Pochards, a single Black Kite, a pair of Barred Buttonquail, large numbers of Grey-headed Swamphens, Eurasian Coot, Black-winged Stilt, three stunning River Lapwings, a few Grey-headed Lapwings, a Spotted Redshank, a few Common Greenshanks, one or two Common Sandpipers, a couple of Temminck's Stints, Green-billed Malkoha, flocks of Asian Palm-Swifts, a beautiful Eurasian Wryneck, a flock of Grey-throated Sand Martins, an Eastern Yellow Wagtail, a couple of Common Ioras, Plain Prinia, Striated Grassbird, Purple Sunbird, a flock of Chestnut-tailed Starlings, and a few Red Avadavats. Vagrant birds always add spice to any tour and today we found no less than three vagrants, Common Shelduck, Mallard and Paddyfield Warbler. We ended the day at a large harrier roost of Pied and Eastern Marsh-Harriers, it was a striking end, to a great days birding.

Our last morning on Doi Lang produced a superb pair of Mountain Bamboo-Partridges, in the middle of the road, a Large Hawk-Cuckoo, Marten's Warbler, a stunning Mrs. Gould's Sunbird and several wintering Crested Buntings. In the afternoon we drove south to Doi Inthanon National Park, and during the drive, a Red-billed Blue Magpie flew across the road in front of our bus. In the late afternoon we did some birding in the grounds of our hill resort, and new birds here included a Eurasian Hoopoe, a couple of Lineated Barbets, a couple of Coppersmith Barbets, a female Blue Rock-Thrush and a couple of stunning Greater Racket-tailed Drongos. At dusk, we taped in a Spotted Owlet and a Brown Hawk-Owl.

We enjoyed a full days birding in Doi Inthanon National Park, which encompasses Thailand's highest mountain. We began with a visit to one of the many waterfalls, where we enjoyed great looks at a Slaty-backed Forktail, as three Black Bazas flew overhead. We spent most of the morning birding along trails in the lower altitude, dry deciduous forest. Here new birds included a pair of Golden-fronted Leafbirds, a singing Claudia's Warbler, a brightly coloured Sulphur-breasted Warbler, an attractive Chestnut-crowned Warbler, a pair of Large Niltavas, a rather dull female Vivid Niltava, a couple of Golden Babblers, a splendid pair of Clicking Shrike-Babblers, a few diminutive Rufous-winged Fulvettas, a male Fire-breasted Flowerpecker and a Grey Treepie. In the late afternoon we birded the moss-encrusted forest at the summit. Here we enjoyed close looks at a Rufous-throated Partridge, a female White-browed Shortwing, an Ashy-throated Warbler, a pair of Small Niltavas, several beautiful Chestnut-tailed Minlas and a splendid male Green-tailed Sunbird, along with several females. A walk around the board-walk at the Summit Marsh, proved very rewarding, with excellent, prolonged looks at the amazing Dark-sided Thrush, a stunning Chestnut-headed Tesia, and a very confiding pair of Snowy-browed Flycatchers.

An early start the following morning found us at high altitude in Doi Inthanon National Park, staring at a very large moss-encrusted old tree, just as the first rays of the morning sun, lit up the tree. Right on cue, over a dozen Speckled Wood-Pigeons flew into the tree to soak up the suns rays, as the temperature was a very low 8 degrees Celsius. We then walked the board-walk at the Summit Marsh, firstly, we found three Rufous-throated Partridges feeding directly under the board-walk, on seeing us, two of them scuttled away, but one decided to `freeze` and we were able to see every marking on this splendid bird. A little further along the board-walk an adult male White-browed Shortwing was out in full view, hopping around in the marsh, completely unconcerned by our presence, a very rare event, for a shortwing! Continuing along the board-walk, we came to a complete stop, when we spotted a motionless Eurasian Woodcock, stood in the middle of a small bog, in the marsh. For the next 10 minutes or so, we watched the bird feeding in the marsh, once again, completely unperturbed by our presence. We continued along the board-walk and came to a rapid halt, when we encountered a Pygmy Wren-Babbler in full song, on an exposed perch, once again, this very shy bird, made no attempt to hide, and we saw it very well indeed. Here we also found our first Yellow-bellied Fantail. We then birded a lower altitude patch of forest, which revealed Ashy Bulbul, Great Iora, Blue-throated Flycatcher and Large Woodshrike.

Following lunch and a short siesta, we drove out to a patch of scrub on the edge of the park, where our main quarry was to be the Blossom-headed Parakeet. We did not have to wait very long, before we found a good number of them. Other new birds for us here, included Plaintive Cuckoo, both Green and Chestnut-headed Bee-eaters, Olive-backed Sunbird, the beautiful Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker, Black-hooded Oriole, Rufous Treepie, Eastern Jungle Crow and the very attractive Plain-backed Sparrow. On returning to our lodge, we found a calling Asian Barred Owlet, close to the restaurant.

A final early morning on Doi Inthanon, found us at a small stream at dawn, where we saw a fine looking Black-backed Forktail. We then birded a patch of low altitude dry deciduous forest, where are only reward was a glimpse of a Lesser Shortwing. We then drove to Chiang Mai, and took an afternoon flight to Bangkok. In the late afternoon we birded in the grounds of the Airport Hotel and found four new species of birds for the tour, House Swift, a pair of beautiful Small Minivets, Yellow-vented Bulbul and Van Hasselt's Sunbird. Plus, a new species of mammal, the Variable Squirrel.

We left Bangkok well before dawn and managed to beat the notorious peak hour Bangkok traffic. We drove southwest to a huge area of salt-pans that line the Gulf of Thailand, at Pak Thale. Of all the many wetland areas I have visited around the globe non are as prolific for waders, as this tremendous area. Our main target bird here, was the critically endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper, and in no time at all, we were enjoying great looks at two of these superb birds. Other new birds for us here and along the nearby mudflats, included four endangered Spot-billed Pelicans, Little and Indian Cormorants, Pat pointed out an endangered Chinese Egret, in full breeding plumage, we also saw Javan Pond-Heron, Painted Stork, Brahminy Kite, Slaty-breasted Rail, Pied Avocet, Pacific Golden-Plover, Grey and Kentish Plovers, literally hundreds of Lesser Sandplovers and several Greater Sandplovers, Common Snipe, both Black-tailed and Bar-tailed Godwits, several endangered Asian Dowitchers, Whimbrel, both Eurasian and Eastern Curlews, Common Redshank, Marsh Sandpiper, up to 40 endangered Nordmann's Greenshanks, both Wood and Terek Sandpipers, Ruddy Turnstone, Great Knot, Ruff, Sanderling, Red-necked and Long-toed Stints, Curlew Sandpiper, many Broad-billed Sandpipers and a staggering flock of 13 Red-necked Phalaropes. Other new birds for the tour included Brown-headed Gull, Caspian, Gull-billed, Little, Whiskered and White-winged Terns, Collared Kingfisher, Indochinese Bushlark, Oriental Skylark, Zitting Cisticola, Mangrove Whistler and Asian Pied Starling. As we drove to our hotel in the small town of Phetchaburi, we found a large troop of Long-tailed Macaques, hanging around in the suburbs.

Early in the morning we birded a small pond which was encircled by reeds, not far from Pak Thale, it proved very rewarding. New birds included a couple of very uncommon Watercocks, a Lesser Coucal, flocks of Germain's Swiftlets flew overhead, a Yellow-bellied Prinia sang from the tops of the reeds, one or two Black-browed Reed-Warblers showed well, as did two, normally skulking Bluethroats, a Streaked Weaver was seen well, as were several Chestnut Munias. We then continued birding in an extensive area of salt-pans and fish ponds. We saw many of the species we had seen yesterday, plus Striated Heron, Black-headed Ibis, Black-capped Kingfisher and Common Tailorbird. In the afternoon, we took a boat out to the sandy spit of Laem Pak Bia, where new birds included a dark morph Pacific Reef-Egret, several Malaysian Plovers, a single, as yet undescribed White-faced Plover, four splendid Pallas's Gulls, a single Lesser Crested Tern, several Great Crested Terns and hundreds of Common Terns. In the late afternoon, we birded an area of rice paddies and fish ponds, where we added Yellow Bittern, Cotton Pygmy-goose, Western Osprey, Peregrine Falcon, White-browed Crake, both Pheasant-tailed and Bronze-winged Jacanas, a pair of Pink-necked Green-Pigeons, Blue-tailed Bee-eater, Freckle-breasted Woodpecker and nesting Asian Golden Weavers, to our ever growing trip list. At dusk we drove to nearby Kaeng Krachan National Park, for a four night stay.

A full day birding in Kaeng Krachan National Park, provided us with a great many new birds for the tour. We started off in the lower section of the park, where we found a very obliging Black-thighed Falconet, perched in the top of a tall tree, a pair of delightful Red Junglefowl scratched around in the leaf litter along the edge of the road, a Thick-billed Green-Pigeon was seen well in the scope, we saw a few Common Emerald Doves, Asian Drongo-Cuckoos proved to be plentiful, we enjoyed super close looks at the beautiful Grey-rumped Treeswift, a Blue-bearded Bee-eater paid us a visit, Oriental Dollarbirds were numerous, we saw a few Oriental Pied Hornbills and a single Tickell's Brown Hornbill. Both Green-eared and Blue-eared Barbets showed well, as did Greater Yellownape and Greater Flameback. We found a pair of Crimson-winged Woodpeckers excavating a nest hole and we saw a pair of Great Slaty Woodpeckers in flight. Great looks at a Black-and-yellow Broadbill were much appreciated, a few Red-rumped Swallows flew overhead, a Black-headed Bulbul popped into view, along with a Stripe-throated Bulbul, and Ochraceous Bulbuls were plentiful, as were a migrating flock of Black-naped Orioles, and a pair of Golden-crested Mynas showed well, in a nearby tree. We then drove back to our lodge for lunch, and while enjoying lunch we added Orange-headed Thrush and both Pale-legged and Eastern Crowned Leaf-Warblers, Black-naped Monarch and a pair of Buff-throated Babblers.

In the afternoon we drove up to the top of the mountain to do some birding, and this produced Red-headed Trogon, a pair of stunning Heart-spotted Woodpeckers, the rarely observed Rufous-browed Flycatcher, hiding deep in the undergrowth, an Asian Paradise-Flycatcher was observed in flight, we saw Pin-striped Tit-Babbler, several splendid Collared Babblers, a pair of delightful Sultan Tits and an Asian Fairy-bluebird. We then drove down the mountain and saw a few Kalij Pheasants along the roadside. As it got dark, a Great-eared Nightjar was observed in flight and we stopped for a pair of Large-tailed Nightjars in the middle of the road. New mammals today, included a few Dusky Langurs, a family group of White-handed Gibbons, a very large Asian Elephant, several Red Muntjacs, a Black Giant Squirrel and a few Grey-bellied Squirrels.

The following day we returned to the lower areas of Kaeng Krachan National Park. With a little help from tape playback we managed to get a rather reluctant Moustached Hawk-Cuckoo, to fly right past us. Then followed perhaps the best sighting of the tour, we found a family party of three rarely observed White-fronted Scops-Owls at their daytime roost, deep inside the forest. We also enjoyed great scope views of a calling Red-throated Barbet, admired a Streak-breasted Woodpecker, two splendid species of broadbills, Black-and-red and Silver-breasted, we saw a few Blue-winged Leafbirds, Rufous-fronted Babbler and a Common Green Magpie. We then returned to our lodge for lunch, where we added a Dark-necked Tailorbird. In the afternoon, following a much appreciated, but all too short siesta, we returned to the lower area of the park, where we found a splendid Chestnut-breasted Malkoha, a Grey-faced Woodpecker, Common Flameback, a delightful Banded Broadbill, Forest Wagtail, Brown-backed Needletail and a Ruby-cheeked Sunbird. As we were driving back down the mountain, heading for our lodge, a Golden Jackal crossed the track, in front of us.

The following day we returned to the lower areas of Kaeng Krachan National Park and found several more new birds for the tour. An Orange-breasted Trogon, was seen well in the scope, we enjoyed good close looks at the diminutive Black-backed Kingfisher, a pair of Great Hornbills flew over our heads, we watched a rather confiding party of five Dusky Broadbills building a nest, both Lesser-necklaced and Greater-necklaced Laughingthrushes flew across the track in front of us and a White-bellied Erpornis, was observed very well. Back to our lodge for lunch, where we found a Taiga Flycatcher. Following lunch, we spent five hours in a hide, a few metres away from a small pool of water, deep inside the forest. It was a riveting five hours, as dozens of birds and various species of squirrels came in to drink and bath. We saw them all at very close quarters and it was extremely enjoyable. New birds seen from the hide included a pair of stunning Bar-backed Partridges a pair of equally stunning Scaly-breasted Partridges, a beautiful Tickell's Blue-Flycatcher, several Abbott's Babblers, a pair of Large Scimitar-Babblers and lots of Brown-cheeked Fulvettas. New mammals included a fine Crab-eating Mongoose, which crossed the track ahead of us in the morning and a diminutive, Lesser Mouse-Deer, which came in to drink at the hide.

A final morning in Kaeng Krachen National Park, to find any birds that we were still missing. New birds during the morning included a very fine Red-bearded Bee-eater, a calling Blue-throated Barbet, a beautiful Black-and-buff Woodpecker that was excavating a nest hole, the very sombre coloured Grey-eyed Bulbul, a wintering Eyebrowed Thrush, perched high in a tree and a furtive Alstrom's Warbler. In the afternoon we drove back to Pak Thale and checked the wetlands, rice paddies and fish farms. We found a Common Sand Martin amongst a large flock of feeding Barn Swallows, and we picked out an endangered Milky Stork, amongst the many hundreds of egrets, ibis and Painted Storks. We then drove to Bangkok, where we spent the night. We added another species of mammal today, the rarely observed Banded Langur.

In the morning we visited Wat Pra Phuttabaht Noi, a splendid area of limestone cast country, where our quarry was the Limestone Wren-Babbler. In no time at all , we were watching a family party amongst the limestone outcrops. Here we also added a single Asian Brown Flycatcher. We then drove to Khao Yai National Park, for a three night stay. We spent the afternoon in the park, where we added no less than 12 new species of birds. Which included a splendid Black Eagle flying just above the tree tops, nesting Red-breasted Parakeets, we enjoyed good close looks at a Vernal Hanging-Parrot, a small flock of Himalayan Swiftlets, several Moustached Barbets, a pair of Paddyfield Pipits, a pair of very obliging Swinhoe's Minivets, both Thick-billed and Yellow-vented Flowerpeckers, several Chestnut-flanked White-eyes and a pair of beautiful Common Hill Mynas, and I was fortunate enough to see a Coral-billed Ground-Cuckoo.

A day of hard work in the rather unresponsive forests of Khao Yai National Park, where the forests grudgingly gave up a Shikra which circled overhead, a pair of dazzling Siamese Firebacks, a single Silver-backed Needletail amongst a large flock of drinking Brown-backed Needletails, we glimpsed a Puff-throated Bulbul and enjoyed super close looks at the gorgeous Black-throated Laughingthrush. In the afternoon a walk along a forest track produced a fine Collared Owlet sitting directly above the track, calling as he did so, and he seemed quite happy just to sit there and look at us. Although the birding is difficult in Khao Yai, in stark contrast the mammals are plentiful and easy to see. Today we added Northern Pig-tailed Macaque, Sambar and Cambodian Striped Squirrel. We also found a huge 3 metre plus Burmese Python, spread out across the road, it is one of the five largest snakes in the world. At dusk we travelled to a spot outside the park were we observed large numbers of Asian Wrinkle-lipped Bats and smaller numbers of Javan Pipistrelles.

Another tough day in the field in Khao Yai National Park produced another good selection of both birds and mammals. New birds for the tour included three Barred Cuckoo-Doves that flew over our heads, a very close Laced Woodpecker, a splendid adult male White-throated Rock-Thrush, in full breeding plumage, a Golden-headed Cisticola and the diminutive Plain Flowerpecker. In the late afternoon as we were gathering to go and look at the bats once more, and I found a White-rumped Munia in the garden of our lodge. At dusk we were in position to watch a mountainside in front of us. As it got dark, literally thousands of Asian Wrinkle-lipped Bats came streaming out of a cave in the mountainside and headed straight over our heads. It was a tremendous spectacle to observe, as the huge flock formed intricate patterns in the sky above our heads. An immature Shikra decided that this was too much of a good opportunity to pass up, and made several attempts to catch a bat, before finally securing his supper.

Our final morning in Khao Yai National Park, failed to add any new species to the trip list. So we continued on to Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park, for an afternoons birding. In sharp contrast to the mornings birding, we found plenty of new birds, including a stunning Black-headed Woodpecker, a pair of huge White-bellied Woodpeckers, a few Rosy Minivets, several Ashy Minivets, a rather sombre plumaged Grey-breasted Prinia, a bathing Eurasian Jay and a few handsome Vinous-breasted Starlings.

A final morning at Sab Sadao, before driving to Bangkok Airport. We found four new birds for the tour, which included a Rufous-winged Buzzard, two migrating Chinese Sparrowhawks, the rather uncommon Indochinese Cuckoo-shrike and the rather plain Brown Prinia.

SYSTAMATIC LIST

GREBES PODICIPEDIDAE
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis A common resident, which we saw well, at a number of
wetlands, throughout the tour.

PELICANS PELECANIDAE
Spot-billed Pelican Pelecanus philippensis We observed up to 40 individuals of this species, during our time at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam. This species is a very uncommon non- breeding winter visitor to Thailand. This species is classified as `Near Threatened` in Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of the World . Its population is estimated to be between 8,700 - 12,000 species and unfortunately, decreasing.

CORMORANTS PHALACROCORACIDAE
Little Cormorant Phalacrocorax niger A numerous breeding species, in wetlands close to
Bangkok.
Indian Cormorant Phalacrocorax fuscicollis Large numbers of breeding birds were present in
Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo A very uncommon non-breeding species in Thailand.
We observed a small flock at Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand.

HERONS, EGRETS AND BITTERNS ARDEIDAE
Little Egret Egretta garzetta A common breeding species and winter visitor throughout all
wetland areas of Thailand.
Chinese Egret Egretta eulophotes Pat pointed out a single bird at Pak Thale, amongst the
hundreds of more common species of egrets, we found a second bird at Laem Pac Bia. This
species is a very uncommon vagrant to Thailand, and this species is classified as
`Vulnerable` in Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of the World . Its population is
estimated to be between 2,500 - 10,000 species and unfortunately, decreasing.
Pacific Reef-Egret Egretta sacra An uncommon breeding species in southern Thailand, a single
dark morph bird was observed at Laem Pak Bia.
Great Egret Ardea alba A common winter visitor throughout northern Thailand and a common
breeding species in the wetlands around Bangkok.
Intermediate Egret Mesophoyx intermedia An uncommon non-breeding winter visitor in
Thailand, which we saw well on several occasions, in suitable wetland areas.
Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus The Cattle Egret has recently been split into two
species; Western and Eastern. The one occurring in Thailand is the Eastern Cattle Egret, where it is a common non-breeding winter visitor to northern Thailand, and a common breeding visitor to the wetlands around Bangkok.
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea A fairly common non-breeding winter visitor to Thailand, which we
saw very well on many occasions.
Purple Heron Ardea purpurea This species is an uncommon non-breeding visitor to northern
Thailand and an uncommon breeding species in the wetlands around Bangkok. We saw a couple in the north, and a few in the south.
Chinese Pond-Heron Ardeola bacchus An abundant non-breeding visitor to Thailand, which we
saw well on numerous occasions.
Javan Pond-Heron Ardeola speciosa A fairly common breeding species, which is confined to the
Bangkok area of Thailand, which we saw well on several occasions.
Striated Heron Butorides striata A very uncommon non-breeding visitor throughout northern
Thailand and a very uncommon breeding species throughout southern Thailand. We
observed a couple of birds while birding at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Yellow Bittern Ixobrychus sinensis A common breeding species throughout Thailand, it prefers to
stay hidden in deep cover and we only flushed one bird, from a reedbed at Pak Thale, on the
Gulf of Siam.

STORKS CICONIIDAE
Milky Stork Mycteria cinerea A rare non-breeding vagrant to Thailand. We were very fortunate
that we found a single bird at Pak Thale, in the Gulf of Siam. This species is classified as
`Endangered` in Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of the World . Its population is
estimated to be 1,500 mature individuals and unfortunately, decreasing.
Painted Stork Mycteria leucocephala An uncommon non-breeding winter visitor and passage
migrant in southern Thailand. We enjoyed several good sightings during our time at Pak
Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Asian Openbill Anastomus oscitans A common non-breeding winter visitor and a common
breeding species in the wetlands around Bangkok. We saw it very well on many occasions.

IBISES AND SPOONBILLS THRESKIORNITHIDAE
Black-headed Ibis Threskiornis melanocephalus An uncommon non-breeding winter visitor to
southern Thailand, we observed small numbers while birding at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of
Siam.

SWANS, GEESE AND DUCKS ANATIDAE
Lesser Whistling-Duck Dendrocygna javanica A common resident throughout all wetland areas
of Thailand, which we saw well on numerous occasions.
Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna A rare non-breeding winter vagrant to Thailand. We were
very fortunate to find a single bird along the edge of the Mekong River, close to Chiang
Saen, in the far north of Thailand.
Cotton Pygmy-Goose Nettapus coromandelianus A locally uncommon breeding resident
throughout Thailand. We observed a small number while birding in the wetlands of Pak
Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Mallard Anas platyrhynchos A very rare winter vagrant to Thailand. We were very fortunate to
observe a single bird amongst many hundreds of wildfowl at Chiang Saen, in the far north of
Thailand.
Indian Spot-billed Duck Anas poecilorhyncha A common non-breeding winter visitor, mainly to
the far north of Thailand. We saw several large flocks, while birding at Chiang Saen, in the
far north of Thailand.
Garganey Anas querquedula A common non-breeding winter visitor to Thailand. We very much
enjoyed watching a large flock of 400 plus birds at Pak Thale, in the Gulf of Siam, where all
the males were in superb breeding plumage. We also observed a single bird in the far north
of Thailand, at Chiang Saen.
Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata An uncommon non-breeding winter visitor throughout
Thailand. We observed a handful of birds at Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand.
Ferruginous Pochard Aythya nyroca A rare non-breeding winter visitor to Thailand. We were
very fortunate to observe half a dozen or so birds at Chiang Saen, in the far north of
Thailand.

OSPREY PANDIONIDAE
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus Recently, the Osprey has been split into two species, Western
and Eastern. The Western Osprey is an uncommon non-breeding winter visitor, mainly to
central Thailand. We observed a single bird very well, sat on a pole, at a large lake at Pak
Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.                                     

KITES, HAWKS AND EAGLES ACCIPITRIDAE
Black Baza Aviceda leuphotes This beautiful raptor is an uncommon breeding resident in
north west Thailand and a common passage migrant and winter visitor to central and
southern Thailand. We observed three birds in flight in Doi Inthanon National Park and
then we observed a second flock of three birds actually on migration, at Sab Sadao, in Thap
Lan National Park.
Oriental Honey-buzzard Pernis ptilorhynchus This species is an uncommon breeding resident in
northern Thailand and a fairly common, but localised, winter visitor, and a common passage
migrant. We enjoyed many good sightings throughout the tour.
Black-shouldered Kite Elanus caeruleus A common breeding resident throughout Thailand,
which we saw well on several occasions.
Black Kite Milvus migrans This species is a common winter visitor and passage migrant and a
rare breeding resident, a little to the north of Bangkok. We observed this species on several
occasions, including a few birds which were actually migrating.
Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus A common breeding resident, which we saw well on several
occasions during our time at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Crested Serpent-Eagle Spilornis cheela A common breeding resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, which we saw well on several occasions.
Eastern Marsh-Harrier Circus spilonotus A common non-breeding winter visitor throughout
Thailand. We observed up to a 100 or so birds, at a night time roost, at Chiang Saen, in the
far north of Thailand, it shared the roost, with Pied Harriers.
Pied Harrier Circus melanoleucos The Pied Harrier is a fairly common non-breeding winter
visitor, throughout the whole of Thailand. We observed a male bird along the Kok River, at Thaton, this was followed by a second male bird at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam and up to a 100 or so birds, at the night time roost at Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand, which it shared with Eastern Marsh-Harriers.
Crested Goshawk Accipiter trivirgatus A common breeding resident, which we saw well in
flight, on a few occasions.
Shikra Accipiter badius A common resident throughout northern and central Thailand and a
common non-breeding, winter visitor, throughout peninsular Thailand. We observed a perched bird and then a bird catching bats at dusk, both sightings occurred in Khao Yai National Park.
Chinese Sparrowhawk Accipiter soloensis This species is an uncommon passage migrant
throughout Thailand. We observed two birds on migration at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan
National Park.
Rufous-winged Buzzard Butastur liventer This species is an uncommon breeding resident in
northern and central Thailand. We enjoyed good scope views of a single bird perched in a
dead tree, close to Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Grey-faced Buzzard Butastur indicus In Thailand this species is a common passage migrant and
winter visitor. We enjoyed good scope views of a single, immature bird, perched in a tree, on Doi Lang.
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus The Common Buzzard has recently been split into three
separate species, European Buzzard, Himalayan Buzzard and Eastern Buzzard. The one
occurring in Thailand is the Eastern Buzzard, where it is an uncommon winter visitor. We
saw a single individual in flight on Doi Ang Khang, and this was followed by a second
sighting, also of a bird in flight, at Chiang Saen.
Black Eagle Ictinaetus malayensis The Black Eagle is an uncommon resident throughout
Thailand, we observed a bird fly directly above our heads, skimming the treetops, in Khao
Yai National Park.
Rufous-bellied Eagle Lophotriorchis kienerii This species is an uncommon resident throughout
Thailand, we were fortunate to observe a bird in flight, while birding on Doi Lang.
Mountain Hawk-Eagle Nisaetus nipalensis In Thailand this species is a highly localised and
uncommon resident. We enjoyed two separate sightings of birds in flight, during our time
on Doi Lang.

CARACARAS AND FALCONS FALCONIDAE
Black-thighed Falconet Microhierax fringillarius A fairly common resident of peninsular
Thailand, we enjoyed good scope views of a perched individual, during our time in Kaeng
Krachen National Park.
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus In Thailand this species is an uncommon winter visitor, we
observed a bird in flight close to Fang, in northern Thailand and this was followed by a
second sighting of a bird flying along the Mekong River, close to Chiang Saen.
Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus The Peregrine Falcon is an uncommon resident and winter
visitor throughout Thailand, which we saw well on a few occasions.

PARTRIDGES AND PHEASANTS PHASIANIDAE
Rufous-throated Partridge Arborophila rufogularis An uncommon resident in northern
Thailand, whose numbers are much reduced by over hunting. We enjoyed super close looks at this very attractive species, on two separate occasions, during our time in Doi Inthanon
National Park.
Bar-backed Partridge Arborophila brunneopectus An uncommon resident in northern and
central Thailand, we very much enjoyed watching a pair at very close quarters, at the Lung
Sin Hide, near Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Scaly-breasted Partridge Arborophila chloropus A common but inconspicuous resident of
northern and central Thailand, we enjoyed a pair at very close quarters, from the Lung Sin
Hide, near Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Mountain Bamboo-Partridge Bambusicola fytchii This species is an uncommon resident in the
far north of Thailand. We were fortunate to enjoy good looks at a pair of birds, in the
middle of the track, early one morning, on Doi Lang.
Red Junglefowl Gallus gallus A common resident throughout Thailand, but much reduced in
recent times in northern Thailand, due to excessive hunting. We saw it well in central
Thailand on many occasions.
Kalij Pheasant Lophura leucomelanos A locally common resident of northwestern Thailand,
where we enjoyed several good looks, during our time in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Siamese Fireback Lophura diardi An uncommon and localised resident throughout northern and
central Thailand, whose numbers are now much reduced, due to excessive hunting. We
enjoyed a few very good sightings in Khao Yai National Park.
Mrs Hume's Pheasant Syrmaticus humiae A rare breeding resident in the far north of Thailand,
along the border with Myanmar. We were very fortunate to observe both male and female
birds, while birding on Doi Lang.

BUTTONQUAIL TURNICIDAE
Barred Buttonquail Turnix suscitator A common resident throughout Thailand, a pair of birds
ran across the track in front of our vehicle, while we were birding at Chiang Saen, in the far
north of Thailand.

RAILS, GALLINULES AND COOTS RALLIDAE
Slaty-breasted Rail Gallirallus striatus This species is a common resident, which we saw well on
a few occasions.
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus A common resident, which we saw well on
many occasions.
Ruddy-breasted Crake Porzana fusca A common resident and wintering species, which we saw
well on several occasions.
White-browed Crake Porzana cinerea An uncommon breeding species of central and southern
Thailand. We saw a few birds very well, in a flooded field at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Watercock Gallicrex cinerea In northern Thailand this species is an uncommon summer breeding
visitor, and it is an uncommon resident breeding species, in central and southern Thailand. We watched two immature birds at a small dam, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Grey-headed Swamphen Porphyrio poliocephalus An uncommon breeding resident of the larger,
less disturbed wetlands of Thailand. We observed large numbers at Chiang Saen, in the far
north of the country.
Eurasian Moorhen Gallinula chloropus A common resident throughout northern and central
Thailand, and a common winter visitor throughout central and southern Thailand. We
enjoyed many good sightings at scattered wetlands throughout the tour.
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra An uncommon winter visitor to Thailand. We observed small numbers at Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand.

JACANAS JACANIDAE
Pheasant-tailed Jacana Hydrophasianus chirurgus A common resident and winter visitor, we
observed small numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Bronze-winged Jacana Metopidius indicus A common resident throughout Thailand, we enjoyed
several good sightings at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

PAINTED-SNIPES ROSTRATULIDAE
Greater Painted-snipe Rostratula benghalensis A common resident, we saw it well along the
Kok River, at Thaton and again at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

STILTS AND AVOCETS RECURVIROSTRIDAE
Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus A fairly common resident and winter visitor, which
we saw very well on many occasions.
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta An uncommon winter visitor to Thailand, we were fortunate
to enjoy watching a sizable flock, while birding at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

COURSERS AND PRATINCOLES GLAREOLIDAE
Oriental Pratincole Glareola maldivarum A very common summer breeding visitor to Thailand,
we very much enjoyed watching several large flocks, throughout the course of the tour.
Small Pratincole Glareola lactea This species is an uncommon resident in northern Thailand and
an uncommon winter visitor to central Thailand. We observed small numbers breeding
along the Kok River, at Thaton and this was followed by a second sighting along the
Mekong River, close to Chiang Saen.
LAPWINGS AND PLOVERS CHARADRIIDAE
River Lapwing Vanellus duvaucelii An uncommon breeding visitor to northern and peninsular
Thailand. We observed small numbers at Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand.
Grey-headed Lapwing Vanellus cinereus A common winter visitor to the far north of Thailand
and an uncommon winter visitor to central and southern Thailand. We observed small numbers at Chiang Saen, in the far north, and small numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Red-wattled Lapwing Vanellus indicus A common resident, which we observed well, throughout
the lowland areas of Thailand.
Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva A common winter visitor, which we saw well at Pak Thale,
on the Gulf of Siam.
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola Another common winter visitor, which we saw well during our
time at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius A common and widespread winter visitor throughout
Thailand, and a local and uncommon breeding resident along the northern rivers of Thailand. We observed many wintering birds, during our time in both northern and central Thailand.
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus A common winter visitor to Thailand, where we
observed small numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
White-faced Plover Charadrius dealbatus This newly-split species is still very poorly-known
owing to historical confusion over its identification. There is insufficient information on its
distribution, and is therefore listed as Data Deficient by Birdlife International. It is known to
breed along the south coast of China, and winter in Thailand, Malaysia and Sumatra. It is
without question a very uncommon bird, and we were very fortunate to observe a single bird fairly well, during our time at Laem Pak Bia.
Malaysian Plover Charadrius peronii A highly localised and uncommon resident of peninsular
Thailand. We saw a few birds in the scope, during our time at Laem Pak Bia.
Lesser Sandplover Charadrius mongolus An extremely common winter visitor to coastal areas of
southern Thailand. It proved to be extremely common at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam,
where we observed literally thousands of birds.
Greater Sandplover Charadrius leschenaultii Another common winter visitor, we observed small
numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

SANDPIPERS AND ALLIES SCOLOPACIDAE
Eurasian Woodcock Scolopax rusticola A very uncommon winter visitor to Thailand,
predominantly in the far north. We were extremely fortunate, to observe a single bird
feeding in a small bog, while birding along the board-walk, at the Summit Marsh, in Doi Inthanon National Park. It was undoubtedly, one of the great highlights of the tour.
Pintail Snipe Gallinago stenura A common winter visitor throughout the whole of Thailand, we
observed a couple of birds along the Kok River, at Thaton and a couple of subsequent
sightings at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago A very common winter visitor throughout the whole of
Thailand. We enjoyed super close looks at a single bird at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Asian Dowitcher Limnodromus semipalmatus This species is an uncommon passage migrant in
Thailand, where we observed a flock of 20 or so birds at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
This species is classified as `Near-Threatened` in Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of
the World . Its population is estimated to be 23,000 mature individuals and unfortunately,
decreasing.
Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa A fairly common winter visitor throughout the whole of
Thailand, we observed large numbers, some in full-breeding plumage, at Pak Thale, on the
Gulf of Siam.
Bar-tailed Godwit Limosa lapponica A fairly common winter visitor to the wetlands around
Bangkok and peninsular Thailand. We observed good numbers, while birding at Pak Thale,
on the Gulf of Siam.
Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus A common winter visitor to coastal areas of Bangkok and
peninsular Thailand. We saw good numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata This species is a fairly common winter visitor to Thailand,
we observed large numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis The Eastern Curlew is a rare passage migrant
through Thailand. We observed small numbers along the coast at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of
Siam.
Terek Sandpiper Xenus cinereus An uncommon winter visitor to coastal areas of central and
peninsular Thailand. We saw small numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos An extremely common winter visitor throughout
Thailand, which we saw well on numerous occasions.
Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus A fairly common winter visitor, we saw a couple of birds
along the Kok River, at Thaton, in the north of Thailand.
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus A fairly common winter visitor, we saw small numbers at
Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand, and much larger numbers at Pak Thale, on the
Gulf of Siam.
Common Greenshank Tringa nebularia A common winter visitor, we also observed small
numbers at Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand, and much larger numbers at Pak
Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Nordmann's Greenshank Tringa guttifer A rare winter visitor to peninsular Thailand. We
observed up to 40 individuals at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam. This species is classified as `Endangered` in Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of the World . Its population is
estimated to be between 330 - 670 individuals and unfortunately, decreasing. Alexander
von Nordmann (1803-1866) was a Finnish born zoologist, who collected extensively in
southern Russia. He went to Berlin in 1827, and in 1832 became a professor at Odessa,
finally becoming Professor of Zoology at Helsinki University in 1849.
Marsh Sandpiper Tringa stagnatilis A very common winter visitor throughout Thailand, we saw
very large numbers, many in full-breeding plumage, during our time at Pak Thale, on the
Gulf of Siam.
Wood Sandpiper Tringa glareola An extremely common winter visitor throughout the whole of
Thailand. We observed large numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Common Redshank Tringa totanus Mainly a common winter visitor to the wetlands of Bangkok
and peninsular Thailand. It breeds in small numbers in central Thailand. We saw large
numbers during our time at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres A uncommon winter visitor and passage migrant to coastal
areas of Thailand. We observed a single flock of half a dozen or so species at Pak Thale, on
the Gulf of Siam.
Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris An uncommon passage migrant and winter visitor to coastal
areas of Thailand. We observed surprisingly high numbers of this species at Pak Thale, on
the Gulf of Siam.
Sanderling Calidris alba A fairly common winter visitor to coastal Thailand. We observed good
numbers of birds, all in winter plumage, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Red-necked Stint Calidris ruficollis An extremely common winter visitor to coastal areas of
Thailand. We enjoyed watching large flocks of this species at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of
Siam.
Temminck's Stint Calidris temminckii A common winter visitor throughout northern and central
Thailand. We observed a few birds at Chiang Saen, in the far north of Thailand, and this was followed by many more sightings at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam. Coenraad Jacob
Temminck (1778-1858) was a Dutch ornithologist, illustrator and collector. He was
appointed the first Director of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie, in Leiden, in 1820
and held that post until his death. He was a wealthy man who had a very large collection of
specimens and live birds. His first task as an ornithologist was to catalogue his father's very
extensive collection. His father was Jacob Temminck, for whom Le Vaillant collected
specimens.
Long-toed Stint Calidris subminuta A common winter visitor throughout Thailand. We enjoyed
watching large numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Curlew Sandpiper Calidris ferruginea A common winter visitor to coastal Thailand. We saw
fairly large numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Spoon-billed Sandpiper Eurynorhynchus pygmeus A very rare passage migrant and winter visitor
to Thailand. We enjoyed very close looks at two individuals, in non-breeding plumage, at
Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam. This species is classified as `Critically Endangered` in
Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of the World . Its population is estimated to be
between 240 - 400 mature individuals and unfortunately, decreasing. Little wonder then it
was voted `Bird of the Tour` by tour participants.
Broad-billed Sandpiper Limicola falcinellus A fairly common winter visitor to coastal areas of
Thailand. We observed surprisingly large numbers of this species at Pak Thale, on the Gulf
of Siam.
Ruff Philomachus pugnax An uncommon winter visitor to Thailand. We observed a few birds at
Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus A rare passage migrant to Thailand. We were
extremely pleased to find a flock of 13 birds, all in non-breeding plumage, and all in the same pond, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.  

GULLS LARIDAE
Pallas's Gull Ichthyaetus ichthyaetus A rare winter visitor to Thailand. We were very pleased to
find four individuals, one in full-breeding plumage, at Laem Pak Bia. Peter Simon Pallas
(1741-1811) was a German zoologist and one of the greatest of the 18th Century naturalists.
He led numerous expeditions throughout much of Russia between 1768-1774. He
described many new species of mammals, birds, fish and insects.
Brown-headed Gull Chroicocephalus brunnicephalus An extremely common winter visitor
throughout Thailand. We observed huge numbers of this species, some in full-breeding
plumage, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

TERNS STERNIDAE
Little Tern Sternula albifrons A common resident, we observed large numbers during our time at
Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam, and also at Laem Pak Bia.
Gull-billed Tern Gelochelidon nilotica A fairly common winter visitor, we observed good
numbers of this species during our time at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam and also at Laem Pak Bia.
Caspian Tern Hydroprogne caspia An uncommon winter visitor to the coastal wetlands, close to
Bangkok. We enjoyed watching good numbers of this species at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of
Siam and also at Laem Pak Bia.
White-winged Tern Chlidonias leucopterus A common winter visitor to coastal Thailand. We
enjoyed watching many birds, all in non-breeding plumage, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of
Siam, and also at Laem Pak Bia.
Whiskered Tern Chlidonias hybrida A very common winter visitor throughout Thailand. We
observed huge numbers at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam, at Laem Pak Bia and at the
wetlands close to Bangkok International Airport.
Common Tern Sterna hirundo A very common winter visitor to coastal Thailand, where we
observed large numbers at Laem Pak Bia and at Pak Thale, both on the Gulf of Siam.
Great Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii This species is a non-breeding visitor and it also nests on
off-shore islands, off the coast of Thailand. We observed large numbers at Laem Pak Bia.
Lesser Crested Tern Thalasseus bengalensis A rare winter visitor to coastal Thailand. We
observed a single bird, at Laem Pak Bia.

PIGEONS AND DOVES COLUMBIDAE
Feral Pigeon Columba livia This introduced species proved to be plentiful throughout the villages
and towns of Thailand.
Speckled Wood-Pigeon Columba hodgsonii An uncommon resident of the far north of Thailand.
We saw a flock of over a dozen birds, early one morning in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Oriental Turtle-Dove Streptopelia orientalis An uncommon resident in the north of Thailand, we
observed small numbers on Doi Lang.
Red Collared-Dove Streptopelia tranquebarica An extremely common resident of northern and
central Thailand, which we observed on many days of the tour.
Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis An extremely common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, which we observed on all but one day of the tour.
Barred Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia unchall A common resident throughout northern and central
Thailand, we observed a few birds in flight, in Khao Yai National Park
Common Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica The Emerald Dove has recently been split into two species; Common and Pacific. The one occurring in Thailand is the Common Emerald Dove, it is a common resident throughout much of the country, we saw it very well on many occasions.
Zebra Dove Geopelia striata A common resident of peninsular Thailand, this species has been
introduced and has thrived, in other areas of Thailand. We observed large numbers of birds
throughout the tour.
Pink-necked Green-Pigeon Treron vernans A common resident of Thailand, we saw a pair very
well at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Thick-billed Green-Pigeon Treron curvirostra A common resident of Thailand, we saw it very
well in both Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks.
Mountain Imperial-Pigeon Ducula badia A common resident throughout much of Thailand,
which we saw well on several occasions.

PARROTS PSITTACIDAE
Blossom-headed Parakeet Psittacula roseata An uncommon resident of northern and central
Thailand, we observed a flock of 20 or so birds at Doi Inthanon National Park.
Red-breasted Parakeet Psittacula alexandri An uncommon to locally common resident
throughout much of Thailand, it proved to be common in Khao Yai National Park.
Vernal Hanging-Parrot Loriculus vernalis A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
saw a few birds very well, during our time in Khao Yai National Park.

CUCKOOS CUCULIDAE
Large Hawk-Cuckoo Hierococcyx sparverioides A common resident throughout northern
Thailand and a common winter visitor to central and peninsular Thailand. We enjoyed
several good sightings throughout the tour.
Moustached Hawk-Cuckoo Hierococcyx vagans An uncommon resident of central and
peninsular Thailand, we managed to coax a bird to fly right past us, in Kaeng Krachen
National Park.
Banded Bay Cuckoo Cacomantis sonneratii An uncommon resident throughout Thailand, we
enjoyed super scope views of a single bird at Pang Makham Pom, in northern Thailand and
we also observed a bird in flight at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park, in central Thailand.
Plaintive Cuckoo Cacomantis merulinus A very common resident of disturbed habitats such as
cultivated areas, parks and gardens. We enjoyed great scope views of a single bird, on the
outskirts of Doi Inthanon National Park.
Asian Emerald Cuckoo Chrysococcyx maculatus An uncommon resident of northern Thailand
and an uncommon winter visitor to the rest of the country. We observed a female in flight,
on one occasion, on Doi Ang Khang.
Asian Drongo-Cuckoo Surniculus lugubris This species is an uncommon resident, a passage
migrant, and a winter visitor. We observed small numbers in Kaeng Krachen National Park
and at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Asian Koel Eudynamys scolopaceus A common resident throughout the whole of Thailand, which
we saw well on many occasions.
Green-billed Malkoha Phaenicophaeus tristis A very common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, which once again, we saw well on many occasions.
Chestnut-breasted Malkoha Phaenicophaeus curvirostris A common resident of peninsular
Thailand, we observed a single bird, very well, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Coral-billed Ground-Cuckoo Carpococcyx renauldi An uncommon resident, unfortunately, I was the only one to see it, while we were birding in Khao Yai National Park.
Greater Coucal Centropus sinensis A very common resident throughout the whole of Thailand,
which we saw well on many occasions.
Lesser Coucal Centropus bengalensis A fairly common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, this species prefers to skulk in dense, swampy grassland. We observed a bird as it
flushed from cover at a reed-fringed pond at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

OWLS STRIGIDAE
White-fronted Scops-Owl Otus sagittatus An extremely rare resident of peninsular Thailand, we
were very fortunate to observe three of these seldom seen birds, at their day-time roost,
deep inside the forest, in Kaeng Krachen National Park. This poorly known species has a
small, rapidly declining, severely fragmented population, which is dependent on lowland or
foothill forest, much of which, has been destroyed or degraded within its range. This
species is classified as `Vulnerable` in Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of the
World. Its population is estimated to be between 2,500 - 10,000 mature individuals and
unfortunately, decreasing.
Collared Scops-Owl Otus lettia A common resident throughout the whole of Thailand, we coaxed a bird into the spotlight, after dark one evening, on Doi Ang Khang.
Brown Wood-Owl Strix leptogrammica An uncommon resident, on the same night we saw the
Collared Scops-Owl, we also managed to coax into the spotlight, one of these very large
species of owls.
Collared Owlet Glaucidium brodiei A common resident, we very much enjoyed watching one of
these birds sitting above a forest track, calling away, in Khao Yai National Park, in the
middle of the day.
Asian Barred Owlet Glaucidium cuculoides A very common resident of Thailand, which we saw
well in daylight hours, on a couple of occasions.
Spotted Owlet Athene brama A common resident, which we saw twice in daylight hours, once in
Doi Inthanon National Park, which was followed by a second sighting, at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Brown Hawk-Owl Ninox scutulata A common resident and winter visitor, we coaxed a bird into
view, in the grounds of our lodge, in Doi Inthanon National Park.

FROGMOUTHS PODARGIDAE
Hodgson's Frogmouth Batrachostomus hodgsoni Undoubtedly, one of the great highlights of the
tour, was observing a female of this very uncommon resident, sat on a nest, on Doi Lang.
Brian Houghton Hodgson FRC (1800-1894) was an official of the East India Company and
Assistant Resident in Nepal from 1825 until 1843, and in Darjeeling between 1845 and 1859. He amassed a collection of 9,512 specimens of birds, consisting of 672 different species, of which 124 had not previously been described.

NIGHTJARS AND ALLIES CAPRIMULGIDAE
Great Eared-Nightjar Eurostopodus macrotis A common resident, we observed a bird in flight,
as we were leaving Kaeng Krachen National Park one evening, and then enjoyed much
better sightings of several birds in Khao Yai National Park.
Large-tailed Nightjar Caprimulgus macrurus This species is a common resident, we observed
several birds sitting on the road, in front of our vehicle, on a couple of evenings, during our
time in Kaeng Krachen National Park.

SWIFTS APODIDAE
Himalayan Swiftlet Aerodramus brevirostris This species is a common resident of north west
Thailand, but only a winter visitor elsewhere in the country. We observed good numbers, during our time in Khao Yai National Park.
Germain's Swiftlet Aerodramus germani The Germain's Swiftlet is a common resident of the
Bangkok area and peninsular Thailand. We observed large flocks while birding at Pak
Thale, on the Gulf of Siam. Louis Rodolphe Germain (1827-1917) was a veterinary surgeon
in the French colonial army serving in Indochina (Vietnam) from 1862-1867. In 1875 he
went to New Caledonia and spent three years there. He made considerable zoological collections in his spare time, donating them to the Paris Museum.
Silver-backed Needletail Hirundapus cochinchinensis This species is an uncommon winter
visitor, mainly to south central Thailand, we observed a few individuals very well amongst
much larger flocks of Brown-backed Needletails, as they were swooping low over lakes, in order to drink. We only saw them in Khao Yai National Park.
Brown-backed Needletail Hirundapus giganteus In sharp contrast, the Brown-backed Needletail
is a common resident throughout much of Thailand, we observed several large flocks, during
our time in Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks.
Asian Palm-Swift Cypsiurus balasiensis A common resident throughout the whole of Thailand,
which we observed on most days of the tour.
Cook's Swift Apus cooki An uncommon resident in the far north west of Thailand, and a fairly
common winter visitor, throughout the rest of Thailand. We observed small numbers in the
far north west and in Kaeng Krachen National Park. John Pemberton Cook (1865-1924)
worked for the Bombay Burma Teak Corporation, (1883-1913). He left India for Kenya in
1913, to run a coffee plantation.
House Swift Apus nipalensis The House Swift is a common resident throughout much of
Thailand, mainly nesting in villages and towns, we enjoyed scattered sightings throughout
the tour.

TREESWIFTS HEMIPROCNIDAE
Grey-rumped Treeswift Hemiprocne longipennis This species is a common resident throughout
peninsular Thailand. We saw a single individual very well, while birding in the Kaeng Krachen National Park.

TROGONS AND QUETZALS TROGONIDAE
Red-headed Trogon Harpactes erythrocephalus A common, though patchily distributed species
throughout Thailand, which we saw well on a few occasions.
Orange-breasted Trogon Harpactes oreskios This species is also a common, and patchily
distributed species throughout Thailand. We saw it well on a couple of occasions, while
birding in Kaeng Krachen National Park. 

KINGFISHERS ALCEDINIDAE
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis Mainly a common winter visitor to Thailand, which we saw
well on several occasions.
Black-backed Kingfisher Ceyx erithaca This species is an uncommon resident throughout much
of northern Thailand, and is mainly a passage migrant throughout central Thailand. We
observed a single bird, very well indeed, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
White-throated Kingfisher Halcyon smyrnensis A common resident, which we saw well on a
number of occasions.
Black-capped Kingfisher Halcyon pileata This species is a common winter visitor and passage
migrant in Thailand. We enjoyed a few scattered sightings throughout the tour.
Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris A common resident of mangroves and coastal
wetlands, throughout coastal Thailand. We saw it well on a few occasions, while birding at
Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

BEE-EATERS MEROPIDAE
Red-bearded Bee-eater Nyctyornis amictus This species is a fairly common resident of peninsular
Thailand. We enjoyed great looks at a single individual during our time in Kaeng Krachen
National Park.
Blue-bearded Bee-eater Nyctyornis athertoni A fairly common resident of the northern half of
Thailand. We saw it well on a couple of occasions in Kaeng Krachen National Park, at the
very southern edge of this birds range.
Green Bee-eater Merops orientalis A common breeding resident throughout much of Thailand,
and a summer breeding visitor in the northeast. We enjoyed many good sightings of this
confiding species of bee-eater, throughout the tour.
Blue-tailed Bee-eater Merops philippinus This species is a common resident in central Thailand,
a common passage migrant in peninsular Thailand and a summer breeding visitor to
north west Thailand. We saw a few birds very well at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam,
where the bird is resident.
Chestnut-headed Bee-eater Merops leschenaulti This species is a common resident, which we
saw well on a number of occasions.

ROLLERS CORACIIDAE
Indian Roller Coracias benghalensis A common resident throughout the whole of Thailand,
which we saw well on many occasions.
Oriental Dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis This is now the official new name for this species. In
Thailand, it is a common resident, which we saw well on several occasions, while birding in
Kaeng Krachen National Park.

HOOPOES UPUPIDAE
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops This species is a common resident throughout Thailand, which
we saw well on several occasion.

HORNBILLS BUCEROTIDAE
Oriental Pied-Hornbill Anthracoceros albirostris A fairly common resident throughout much of
Thailand, which we saw well on several occasions.
Great Hornbill Buceros bicornis This species is an uncommon, to locally common resident,
throughout the western half of Thailand. We saw it very well on a few occasions in both
Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks.
Tickell's Brown Hornbill Anorrhinus tickelli The Brown Hornbill has recently been split into two
separate species; the species that occurs in Thailand is the Tickell's Brown Hornbill, which is an uncommon resident throughout much of Thailand. This species is classified as `Near
Threatened` in Birdlife Internationals Threatened Birds of the World . Its population is
unknown. We glimpsed this species on two separate occasions, while birding in Kaeng Krachen National Park. Colonel Samuel Richard Tickell (1811-1875) was a British army officer, artist and ornithologist in India and Burma. He made important early contributions to Indian ornithology while observing and collecting both bird and mammal specimens, in the states of Bihar, Orissa, Darjeeling and Tenasserim.

BARBETS CAPITONIDAE
Great Barbet Megalaima virens The Great Barbet is a common resident throughout north west
Thailand. We enjoyed great scope views of this species, on one occasion, while birding on
Doi Lang.
Lineated Barbet Megalaima lineata This species is a common resident throughout much of
Thailand, where we saw it very well on several occasions.
Green-eared Barbet Megalaima faiostricta This species is also a common resident throughout
much of Thailand, and once again, we saw it very well, on several occasions.
Red-throated Barbet Megalaima mystacophanos A common resident throughout peninsular
Thailand, we enjoyed good scope views of a single bird, while birding in Kaeng Krachen
National Park. This species is classified as `Near Threatened` in Birdlife Internationals
Threatened Birds of the World . Its population is unknown.
Golden-throated Barbet Megalaima franklinii The Golden-throated Barbet is a common resident
of north west Thailand, where we saw it well on a number of occasions.
Blue-throated Barbet Megalaima asiatica This species is also a common resident, predominantly
in north west Thailand. We saw it well on a few occasions, while birding in Kaeng Krachen National Park, right at the southern edge of this birds range.
Moustached Barbet Megalaima incognita This species is a common resident with a small,
somewhat patchy distribution, throughout Thailand. We saw it well on several occasions,
during our time in Khao Yai National Park.
Blue-eared Barbet Megalaima australis A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
saw it very well in both Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks.
Coppersmith Barbet Megalaima haemacephala A common resident, throughout the whole of
Thailand, which we saw well on many occasions.

WOODPECKERS PICIDAE
Eurasian Wryneck Jynx torquilla A fairly common winter visitor throughout all but peninsular
Thailand. We very much enjoyed watching a single bird, at Chiang Saen, in the far north of
Thailand.
Grey-capped Pygmy-Woodpecker Dendrocopos canicapillus A common resident throughout
much of Thailand, where we saw it well on several occasions.
Freckle-breasted Woodpecker Dendrocopos analis A recent split from Fulvous-breasted
Woodpecker, the Freckle-breasted Woodpecker is an uncommon resident of central
Thailand. We observed one of these birds along the edge of a road, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Stripe-breasted Woodpecker Dendrocopos atratus A common resident of north west Thailand, which we saw well on a number of occasions.
White-bellied Woodpecker Dryocopus javensis This species is an uncommon resident, occurring
throughout much of Thailand. We observed this bird well on two separate occasions, both
sightings occurred at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Banded Woodpecker Picus miniaceus This delightful species is an uncommon resident
throughout peninsular Thailand. We found a bird excavating a nest hole, in a large tree, in
Kaeng Krachen National Park, which enabled us to see the bird extremely well.
Lesser Yellownape Picus chlorolophus A common resident, predominantly throughout western
Thailand, we saw it well on a few occasions on Doi Lang and again at Sab Sadao, in Thap
Lan National Park.
Crimson-winged Woodpecker Picus puniceus This species is a common resident throughout
peninsular Thailand. Once again, we found one of these birds excavating a nest hole in a
large tree, in Kaeng Krachen National Park, which enabled us to observe it very well.
Greater Yellownape Picus flavinucha A common resident with a patchy distribution throughout
Thailand. However, it proved common in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Streak-breasted Woodpecker Picus viridanus An uncommon resident of southwestern and
peninsular Thailand, we saw it very well on one occasion, in Kaeng Krachen National Park .
Laced Woodpecker Picus vittatus A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we observed
it very well on one occasion, in Khao Yai National Park.
Black-headed Woodpecker Picus erythropygius This species is an uncommon resident with a
patchy distribution throughout Thailand. We saw a bird very well, at Sab Sadao, in Thap
Lan National Park.
Grey-faced Woodpecker Picus canus This species has been recently split from Grey-headed
Woodpecker. It is an uncommon resident throughout much of northern Thailand. We saw it
well on one occasion, while birding in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Common Flameback Dinopium javanense The Common Flameback is a common resident
throughout much of Thailand. We saw it very well in Kaeng Krachen National Park, and
again, at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Greater Flameback Chrysocolaptes lucidus This species is also a common resident throughout
much of Thailand. We saw it well on one occasion, during our time in Kaeng Krachen
National Park.
Bay Woodpecker Blythipicus pyrrhotis This rather manic species of woodpecker, is almost
impossible to see well, it is incredibly shy, and at the slightest provocation, it flies off,
calling loudly as it does so. True to form, this is exactly what it did to us, on both of our
meetings, on Doi Lang and in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Black-and-buff Woodpecker Meiglyptes jugularis This uncommon resident has a patchy
distribution throughout Thailand. Fortunately, we found a bird excavating a nest hole, in a
large tree, in Kaeng Krachen National Park, which enabled us to see the bird very well.
Heart-spotted Woodpecker Hemicircus canente This species is a fairly common resident, with a
somewhat patchy distribution throughout Thailand. We observed a bird very well during
our time in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Great Slaty Woodpecker Mulleripicus pulverulentus An uncommon resident, which occurs
throughout much of Thailand, we saw it well on a few occasions in Kaeng Krachen National
Park.                             

BROADBILLS EURYLAIMIDAE
Black-and-red Broadbill Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos A rare resident throughout southern
Thailand, we were very fortunate to enjoy good looks at a single individual, while birding
in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Long-tailed Broadbill Psarisomus dalhousiae A fairly common resident, predominantly in
north west Thailand. We found a nesting bird on Doi Lang and again in Kaeng Krachen
National Park.
Silver-breasted Broadbill Serilophus lunatus A fairly common resident, which occurs throughout
much of Thailand. We saw it very well on a couple of occasions, while birding in Kaeng
Krachen National Park.
Banded Broadbill Eurylaimus javanicus An uncommon to fairly common resident, occurring
mainly in western Thailand. We saw it very well on a couple of occasions, during our time
in Kaeng Krachen National Park
Black-and-yellow Broadbill Eurylaimus ochromalus A fairly common resident, predominantly in
peninsular Thailand. We were very fortunate to see this beautiful species very well, during
our time in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Dusky Broadbill Corydon sumatranus An uncommon resident which occurs throughout much of
Thailand. We found a party of five birds building a nest in Kaeng Krachen National Park,
which enabled us to see this species very well.

PITTAS PITTIDAE
Rusty-naped Pitta Pitta oatesi The Rusty-naped Pitta is an uncommon resident of north west
Thailand. It is an extremely shy and secretive species and is very difficult to see. It was
very fortunate for us that one came into a feeding station at the Kings Project, on Doi Ang
Khang.

LARKS ALAUDIDAE
Indochinese Bushlark Mirafra erythrocephala A local and uncommon resident of northern
Thailand, we saw it very well indeed, on a few occasions at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Oriental Skylark Alauda gulgula The Oriental Skylark is an uncommon resident, mainly of
central Thailand. We saw a couple of individuals in a ploughed field, close to Pak Thale, on
the Gulf of Siam.  

SWALLOWS HIRUNDINIDAE
Grey-throated Sand Martin Riparia chinensis A split from Plain Martin. This species is a local
and uncommon resident of northern Thailand. We found a large flock feeding along the
edge of the Mekong River, close to Chiang Saen.
Common Sand Martin Riparia riparia The Common Sand Martin is a fairly common winter
visitor throughout Thailand. Therefore, it was somewhat surprising, that we only found one
bird, amongst a huge flock of wintering Barn Swallows, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica An abundant winter visitor throughout Thailand. We also found six pairs nesting, high on Doi Lang, in the far north. It has only been recorded breeding in
Thailand, on a handful of occasions.
Red-rumped Swallow Cecropis daurica A common winter visitor to Thailand, which we saw
well on many occasions, but only in the lowlands.
Striated Swallow Cecropis striolata A common resident throughout western Thailand, it proved
to be very common in the north west.

PIPITS AND WAGTAILS MOTACILLIDAE
Paddyfield Pipit Anthus rufulus A common resident, which we saw very well, towards the end of
the tour.
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni A common winter visitor, mainly to northern and western
Thailand. We observed large flocks during our time in the north.
Forest Wagtail Dendronanthus indicus A common winter visitor, we only saw it once, in Kaeng
Krachen National Park.
White Wagtail Motacilla alba A common winter visitor to northern Thailand, somewhat
surprisingly, we only observed a few birds.
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis A very common winter visitor throughout
Thailand, which we saw well on a few occasions.
Grey Wagtail Motacilla cinerea Yet another common winter visitor throughout Thailand, which
we saw well on many occasions.

CUCKOO-SHRIKES CAMPEPHAGIDAE
Large Cuckoo-shrike Coracina macei A fairly common resident of northern Thailand, which we
saw well on several occasions.
Indochinese Cuckoo-shrike Coracina polioptera An uncommon resident of western Thailand, we
observed a single individual at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park, on the last day of the
tour.
Black-winged Cuckoo-shrike Coracina melaschistos A common resident in northwestern
Thailand and a common winter visitor throughout the country. We enjoyed several good
sightings of this species.
Rosy Minivet Pericrocotus roseus A fairly common winter visitor to much of Thailand, we saw a
few large flocks at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Swinhoe's Minivet Pericrocotus cantonensis An uncommon winter visitor throughout much of
Thailand. We observed small numbers of this species, during our time in Khao Yai National
Park. Robert Swinhoe (1836-1877) was born in Calcutta, India, and was sent to England to
be educated. He worked in China as a diplomat and during this time he explored a vast area
which had not been open previously to any other collector. As a result he discovered new
species at the rate of about one per month throughout the more than 19 years he was there.
He discovered more than 200 new species of birds.
Ashy Minivet Pericrocotus divaricatus A fairly common winter visitor to the whole of Thailand,
we observed a few wintering flocks at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.                            

Small Minivet Pericrocotus cinnamomeus This species is a common resident, we saw a pair in the
grounds of our airport hotel at Bangkok and it proved quite common at Sab Sadao, in Thap
Lan National Park.
Long-tailed Minivet Pericrocotus ethologus A common resident of northwestern Thailand, which
we saw well on many occasions.
Short-billed Minivet Pericrocotus brevirostris In Thailand, this species only occurs in the
north west, where it is a common resident, we saw it very well on several occasions.
Scarlet Minivet Pericrocotus flammeus Another common resident, which occurs throughout most
of Thailand, we saw it well on many occasions.
Grey-chinned Minivet Pericrocotus solaris A common resident of northern and western
Thailand, mainly in the hills. We also saw it well on several occasions.
Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrike Hemipus picatus A common resident throughout Thailand, which
we saw well on several occasions.

BULBULS PYCNONOTIDAE
Crested Finchbill Spizixos canifrons A locally common resident of the far north, where we
enjoyed watching a few small flocks.
Striated Bulbul Pycnonotus striatus A fairly common resident of the north west, where we saw a
few pairs very well.
Black-headed Bulbul Pycnonotus atriceps A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
saw it well on several occasions.
Black-crested Bulbul Pycnonotus melanicterus A very common and widespread resident, which
we saw well on a great many occasions.
Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus A common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, we only observed it in the north west.
Brown-breasted Bulbul Pycnonotus xanthorrhous A locally common resident in the extreme far
north. We observed it well on Doi Ang Khang and on Doi Lang.
Sooty-headed Bulbul Pycnonotus aurigaster An abundant resident of the northern half of
Thailand, excluding the peninsular. We saw it well on many occasions.
Stripe-throated Bulbul Pycnonotus finlaysoni A common resident throughout much of Thailand,
it was a species we saw well on several occasions.
Flavescent Bulbul Pycnonotus flavescens A common resident, predominantly of the north west,
where we saw it well on many occasions.
Yellow-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus goiavier A common resident of the far south and peninsular
Thailand. We saw several birds in the grounds of our airport hotel at Bangkok, and we also
saw a few at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Streak-eared Bulbul Pycnonotus blanfordi A very common resident, throughout the whole of
Thailand, we saw it well on many occasions.
Puff-throated Bulbul Alophoixus pallidus A common resident throughout much of Thailand,
somewhat surprisingly, we only observed this species on a few occasions, in Khao Yai
National Park.
Ochraceous Bulbul Alophoixus ochraceus A common resident of the far south and peninsular
Thailand. We saw it well on a number of occasions in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Grey-eyed Bulbul Iole propinqua A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we observed
small numbers in both Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks.
Mountain Bulbul Ixos mcclellandii A common resident of the higher summits of northern
Thailand. We saw it well on a number of occasions.
Ashy Bulbul Hemixos flavala A common resident, in isolated patches of forest. We observed this
species in Doi Inthanon National Park and again in Khao Yai National Park.

LEAFBIRDS CHLOROPSEIDAE
Blue-winged Leafbird Chloropsis cochinchinensis A common resident throughout much of
Thailand, which we saw well on several occasions.
Golden-fronted Leafbird Chloropsis aurifrons Another common and widespread resident, which
we also saw well on several occasions.
Orange-bellied Leafbird Chloropsis hardwickii A fairly common resident of northern Thailand,
we observed it well on Doi Ang Khang and on Doi Lang.

IORAS AEGITHINIDAE
Common Iora Aegithina tiphia A common resident throughout the whole of Thailand, which we
saw well on numerous occasions.
Great Iora Aegithina lafresnayei Another common and widespread resident, which we saw well
on a few occasions.

THRUSHES and ALLIES TURDIDAE
White-throated Rock-Thrush Monticola gularis This beautiful species, is an uncommon winter
visitor to Thailand. We saw a stunning adult male, while birding in Khao Yai National
Park .
Chestnut-bellied Rock-Thrush Monticola rufiventris An uncommon winter visitor to northern
Thailand, with an isolated breeding population on the upper slopes of Doi Inthanon. We
observed both males and females, while birding on Doi Ang Khang.
Blue Rock-Thrush Monticola solitarius Mainly a common winter visitor, however, the race
madoci, breeds in peninsular Thailand. We observed this species on many occasions.
Blue Whistling-Thrush Myophonus caeruleus This species is both a common resident and a
common winter visitor. We observed this species on several occasions and saw both races
that occur in Thailand.
Orange-headed Thrush Zoothera citrina An uncommon resident of northern Thailand and an
uncommon winter visitor to southern Thailand. We observed a fine adult male, while
having lunch at our lodge, on the edge of Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Dark-sided Thrush Zoothera marginata A very uncommon resident of northwestern Thailand,
watching this bird standing motionless in the Summit Marsh, at the very top of Doi
Inthanon, was one of the great highlights of the tour.
Black-breasted Thrush Turdus dissimilis A rare and irregular winter visitor to the extreme north
of Thailand. We were extremely fortunate, that this normally very shy species of thrush,
was coming into a feeding station, in the grounds of our lodge at Doi Ang Khang, allowing
us to observe this very uncommon species particularly well.
Eyebrowed Thrush Turdus obscurus In most years the Eyebrowed Thrush is a common winter
visitor throughout Thailand, however, numbers fluctuate from year to year. This year, there
must have been very few, as we only observed one bird, perched high in a tree, in Kaeng
Krachen National Park.
Lesser Shortwing Brachypteryx leucophrys Shortwings are amongst the shiest birds in the world,
the Lesser Shortwing is a locally common resident of north west Thailand, but very
seldom seen. While in Doi Inthanon National Park, we birded a patch of low altitude dry
deciduous forest, searching for Slaty-bellied Tesia, our only reward, was a glimpse of this
species.
White-browed Shortwing Brachypteryx montana The White-browed Shortwing is also seldom
observed and is an uncommon resident of north west Thailand. A female came into a
feeding station in Doi Inthanon National Park, and we were able to see it from just a few
metres away. The following day, while birding along the board-walk at the Summit Marsh, at the very top of Doi Inthanon, we watched an adult male feeding on the ground, which was
completely unperturbed by our presence, it was a thrilling sight.

CISTICOLAS and ALLIES CISTICOLIDAE
Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis A very common resident throughout Thailand, we saw it well on a couple of occasions, in long grass at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Golden-headed Cisticola Cisticola exilis A common, though patchily distributed resident,
throughout much of Thailand. We only observed this species on one occasion, we managed
to coax one into view, in very long grass, in Khao Yai National Park.
Brown Prinia Prinia polychroa The Brown Prinia is an uncommon to locally common resident of
northern Thailand. We observed a couple of these birds on the last day of the tour, at Sab
Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Hill Prinia Prinia atrogularis A common resident of north west Thailand, we saw it well on two
separate occasions, the first sighting occurred on Doi Ang Khang, and the second, on Doi
Lang.
Rufescent Prinia Prinia rufescens A very common resident throughout much of Thailand, which
we saw well on several occasions.
Grey-breasted Prinia Prinia hodgsonii This species is also a common resident throughout much
of Thailand. We saw a single individual very well, in farmland, very close to Sab Sadao, in
Thap Lan National Park.
Yellow-bellied Prinia Prinia flaviventris Another common resident, this one occurs throughout
the whole of Thailand. We only saw one bird, singing from a small reedbed, which fringed
a small pond, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata Once again, another widespread and common resident, which we
saw well on a few occasions throughout the tour.

OLD WORLD WARBLERS SYLVIIDAE
Chestnut-headed Tesia Tesia castaneocoronata This very beautiful bird is an uncommon resident
of northwestern Thailand, which I glimpsed on one occasion, at the Summit Marsh, in Doi
Inthanon National Park.
Aberrant Bush-Warbler Cettia flavolivacea This rather plain species is an uncommon winter
visitor to the far north west of Thailand. It is a skulking, seldom seen species, somewhat
surprisingly, we managed to see it very well on two separate occasions, while birding on Doi
Lang.
Baikal Bush-Warbler Bradypterus davidi A recent split from Spotted Bush-Warbler, this species
is a common winter visitor throughout northwestern Thailand. This is a particularly
skulking bush-warbler, and rather surprisingly, we saw it fairly well, on two separate
occasions. The first sighting took place along the Kok River, at Thaton and the second
sighting took place at Chiang Saen.
Black-browed Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps A very common winter visitor,
throughout much of Thailand. We saw a couple of birds very well at the reed-fringed small
pond, at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Paddyfield Warbler Acrocephalus agricola This species is an extremely rare winter visitor to
Thailand. We saw a single individual very well and at very close quarters in a lowland
marsh at Chiang Saen. This was the first sight record for Thailand, all previous
observations, where of birds that been caught in mist-nets.
Oriental Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus orientalis A very common winter visitor throughout the
whole of Thailand, which we saw well, on a few occasions.
Mountain Tailorbird Phyllergates cucullatus A fairly common resident of north west Thailand,
we observed a single individual extremely well, high on Doi Lang.
Common Tailorbird Orthotomus sutorius A very common resident throughout the whole of Thailand, which we saw well on a few occasions.
Dark-necked Tailorbird Orthotomus atrogularis Another very common resident, which occurs
throughout the whole of Thailand. We saw it well on one occasion, while having lunch in
the grounds of our lodge, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Dusky Warbler Phylloscopus fuscatus A very common winter visitor to the northern half of
Thailand, we saw it very well on a few occasions.
Yellow-streaked Warbler Phylloscopus armandii A fairly common winter visitor to northwestern
Thailand, we saw a single individual, at the top of Doi Ang Khang, on the second day of the
tour.
Radde's Warbler Phylloscopus schwarzi A common winter visitor throughout much of Thailand,
which we saw well on several occasions. Gustav Ferdinand Richard Radde (1831-1903)
was originally trained as an apothecary. The Prussian naturalist and explorer founded the
Caucasian Museum in Tiflis, Georgia, in 1867.
Buff-barred Warbler Phylloscopus pulcher This species is an uncommon, to locally common,
winter visitor to northwestern Thailand, where we saw it well on a number of occasions.
Ashy-throated Warbler Phylloscopus maculipennis In Thailand, this diminutive species of
phylloscopus warbler is a resident species, which only occurs in the evergreen hill forests,
on the upper slopes of Doi Inthanon National Park, where we saw it very well.
Chinese Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus yunnanensis An uncommon winter visitor to northwestern
Thailand. We were very fortunate that a single bird came to drink water from a small hole
in the ground, on Doi Lang, enabling us to see it very well.
Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus A very common winter visitor, throughout the
whole of Thailand, which we saw well on numerous occasions.
Hume's Warbler Phylloscopus humei A common winter visitor, but only in the extreme north
west of Thailand. We found it to be common on Doi Ang Khang. Allan Octavian Hume
CB (1829-1912) was a famous Theosophis and poet, and also a writer on Indian birds. He
was born in London to a Radical Member of parliament Joseph Hume. Allan Hume joined
the Bengal Civil Service at the age of 20. He wrote `The Game Birds of India` and `Indian
Oology and Ornithology`. After his retirement he was co-founder of the Indian National
Congress in 1885, and became its General Secretary until 1906.
Two-barred Warbler Phylloscopus plunbeitarsus A common winter visitor, throughout the
whole of Thailand, we saw it very well on one occasion, on Doi Ang Khang.
Pale-legged Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus tenellipes Once again, a common winter visitor,
throughout much of Thailand, we observed it several times, while birding in Kaeng Krachen
National Park.
Eastern Crowned Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus coronatus Throughout the northern two-thirds of
Thailand, this species is a common passage migrant and a common winter visitor to
peninsular Thailand. We saw a single bird very well, while having lunch at our lodge, on
the edge of Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Blyth's Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus reguloides A common winter visitor, throughout much of
Thailand, we saw it well on several occasions. Edward Blyth (1810-1873) was an English
zoologist and author. He was Curator of the museum of the Asiatic Society of Bengal from
1842-1864. He wrote The Natural History of Cranes in 1881.



Claudia's Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus claudiae This species is a recent split from Blyth's Leaf-
Warbler, it is a common winter visitor to northern Thailand. It proved to be quite common
on the higher slopes of Doi Inthanon National Park. Claudia Bernadine Elizabeth Hertert
nee Reinard (1863-1958) was an ornithologist and wife of Ernst Johann Otto Hertert. She
published several articles jointly with him, some describing new species. She moved from
England to Holland in 1939.
Davison's Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus davisoni A very common resident throughout much of
Thailand, which we saw well on several occasions. William Ruxton Davison died 1893. He
was a British ornithologist and Curator of Raffles Museum, in Singapore (1887-1893). He
collected for Hume (1870's), during which time (1875) he discovered Gurney's Pitta, and
later wrote `A revised list of the birds of Tenasserim` in 1878, with Hume.
Sulphur-breasted Warbler Phylloscopus ricketti This brightly coloured phylloscopus warbler is
a fairly common winter visitor throughout much of Thailand. We saw a single individual
very well, on the upper slopes of Doi Inthanon National Park.
Alstrom's Warbler Seicercus soror A fairly common winter visitor, mainly to central Thailand.
We saw a single bird very well in Kaeng Krachen National Park. Per Alstrom is a Swedish
ornithologist who specialises in the field of passerine taxonomy, and he recently split the
Golden-spectacled Warbler into six separate species, one of which is Alstrom's Warbler.
The following two species were also part of this split.
Martens's Warbler Seicercus omeiensis A fairly common winter visitor to much of Thailand.
We saw it well on a couple of occasions, in Doi Inthanon National Park. Doctor Jochen
Martens was born in 1941, he is a German zoologist, particularly interested in archaeology
and ornithology. He is now a professor at Johannes Gutenberg University at Mainz, where
he started teaching in 1976. He spent 16 months in Nepal 1969-1970 collecting birds and
recording vocalisations. He has also spent time undertaking field work in China, India,
Russia, the Caucasus, Iran and the Philippines.
Bianchi's Warbler Seicercus valentini A fairly common winter visitor to northern Thailand, we
saw a single individual very well on Doi Lang. Valentin L. Bianchi (1857-1920) was a
Russian zoologist and ornithologist who was an associate of Berezovski. Together they
discovered and described the Black-throated Robin in 1891. He was the Curator of the
Ornithological Department of the Imperial Academy of Sciences at St. Petersburg. Writing
with GG Jacobson, he published Orthoptera and Pseudoneuroptera of the Russian Empire
and adjacent countries in 1905 in St. Petersburg. His son VV Bianki is a well-known writer
on nature and ornithology in present day Russia.
Chestnut-crowned Warbler Seicercus castaniceps An uncommon to locally common resident in
the north west of Thailand. This attractive species of warbler proved fairly common in Doi
Inthanon National Park.
Striated Grassbird Megalurus palustris A fairly common resident of marshland and tall reeds, it
occurs in the far north west of Thailand and predominantly, in south central Thailand. We saw it very well on one occasion at Chiang Saen, in the far north.

OLD WORLD FLYCATCHERS MUSCICAPIDAE
Asian Brown Flycatcher Muscicapa dauurica Predominantly, a very common winter visitor, with
a small breeding population in north west Thailand. We saw it well on a number of
occasions, during our time in Khao Yai National Park.
Slaty-backed Flycatcher Ficedula hodgsonii A fairly common winter visitor to northern
Thailand. We saw it well on a couple of occasions, at the feeding stations on Doi Lang.
Rufous-gorgeted Flycatcher Ficedula strophiata A fairly common winter visitor to the north
west of Thailand, where we saw it well on Doi Lang, on a few occasions.                                                      

Taiga Flycatcher Ficedula albicilla A very common winter visitor, throughout the whole of
Thailand, it proved particularly numerous in Khao Yai National Park.
Snowy-browed Flycatcher Ficedula hyperythra An uncommon to fairly common resident of
northern Thailand. A stunning male came into a feeding station, in Doi Inthanon National
Park.
White-gorgeted Flycatcher Ficedula monileger An uncommon resident of the north west, we
saw it surprisingly well on a few occasions.
Rufous-browed Flycatcher Ficedula solitaris An uncommon resident of central western
Thailand, this species prefers to inhabit dense evergreen hill slopes and is therefore
normally, very difficult to see. Fortunately for us, we saw it very well on two separate
occasions, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Little Pied Flycatcher Ficedula westermanni A common resident, predominantly of northern
Thailand, where we saw this beautiful species very well, on a good number of occasions.
Ultramarine Flycatcher Ficedula superciliaris A rare winter visitor to the very far north west of
Thailand. We were very fortunate that one of these birds was coming into a feeding station,
on the lower slopes of Doi Lang.
Slaty-blue Flycatcher Ficedula tricolor An uncommon winter visitor to north west Thailand.
Once again, we were very fortunate that this bird was visiting a feeding station on Doi Lang.
Sapphire Flycatcher Ficedula sapphira An uncommon winter visitor to north west Thailand. We
were very fortunate to observe an adult male, while birding at the top of Doi Lang.
Verditer Flycatcher Eumyias thalassinus This species is both a common resident and a common
winter visitor. It proved particularly common in the north, where we saw it very well on
numerous occasions.
Large Niltava Niltava grandis A common resident of north west Thailand, we observed this
species well on a couple of occasions in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Small Niltava Niltava macgrigoriae An uncommon resident of north west Thailand, we observed
a pair particularly well, from the board-walk at the Summit Marsh, at the top of Doi
Inthanon National Park.
Rufous-bellied Niltava Niltava sundara This very beautiful species is a common winter visitor to
the far north west of Thailand. We saw it very well on both Doi Ang Khang and Doi Lang.
Vivid Niltava Niltava vivida Once again, this species is an uncommon winter visitor to the far
north west of Thailand. We enjoyed good, prolonged looks at a female of this species, while
birding in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Pale Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis unicolor This species is an uncommon resident of north west
Thailand, where we saw an adult male very well, on one occasion, during our time on Doi
Lang.
Blue-throated Flycatcher Cyornis rubeculoides This species is a fairly common resident of
western Thailand. We observed an adult male very well, on one occasion, during our time in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Chinese Blue Flycatcher Cyornis glaucicomans A recent split from Blue-throated Flycatcher, this species is an uncommon winter visitor to peninsular Thailand. Robert saw one of these birds, while we were birding in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Hill Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis banyumas This species is a very common resident in northern
Thailand, a passage migrant throughout the whole of Thailand and a winter visitor to the
southern part of the peninsular. We saw this species extremely well at a feeding station on
Doi Ang Khang.
Tickell's Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis tickelliae This species is a common resident throughout
Thailand, we saw it exceptionally well at the Lung Sin Hide, near Kaeng Krachen National
Park.

Grey-headed Canary-Flycatcher Culicicapa ceylonensis This species is a common resident
throughout northern Thailand and a common winter visitor elsewhere in the country. We
saw it very well on several occasions throughout the tour.
Siberian Rubythroat Luscinia calliope A common winter visitor throughout much of Thailand,
we saw this beautiful, but usually very skulking bird, at a feeding station on Doi Ang Khang,
at a feeding station on Doi Lang and we also saw it at at the small reed-fringed pond at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Bluethroat Luscinia svecica A common winter visitor throughout much of Thailand,
unfortunately, this attractive species is yet another that is a great skulker on its wintering
grounds. We were very fortunate to enjoy good looks at two separate individuals, at the
small reed-fringed pond at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Siberian Blue Robin Luscinia cyane Yet another attractive species that is a great skulker on its
wintering grounds. Fortunately, thanks to the combination of feeding stations, and it not
being quite so skulking as the above two species, we saw young males and females very
well, but unfortunately, we never saw an adult male.
Himalayan Bluetail Tarsiger rufilatus This species is an uncommon, to locally common winter
visitor, to the far north of Thailand. Once again, we obtained super looks at an adult male at
a feeding station on Doi Lang.
Oriental Magpie-Robin Copsychus saularis A very common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, we saw it on all but two days of the tour.
White-rumped Shama Copsychus malabaricus A very common resident throughout much of
Thailand, we observed it on a daily basis, throughout the lowlands.
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus An uncommon winter visitor to the far north of
Thailand, we enjoyed watching a very handsome male on Doi Ang Khang.
White-capped Redstart Chaimarrornis leucocephalus An uncommon resident of the far north of
Thailand. We observed this very attractive species along a small stream in the grounds of
our lodge on Doi Ang Khang.
White-bellied Redstart Hodgsonius phaenicuroides One of the most skulking and most difficult to see birds in the world, extremely shy and elusive. Fortunately for us, a female came into water on Doi Lang.
White-tailed Robin Cinclidium leucurum An uncommon resident of the far north and another
great skulker. Fortunately, an adult male was regularly attending a feeding station on Doi
Ang Khang, which enabled us to enjoy point blank looks at this very beautiful bird.
Black-backed Forktail Enicurus immaculatus An uncommon resident of the far north west of
Thailand. We enjoyed good looks at a single bird at a large waterfall in Doi Inthanon
National Park.
Slaty-backed Forktail Enicurus schistaceus A common resident of northern and western
Thailand. At our second attempt, we managed to enjoy great looks at this very attractive
species, at a small river in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Siberian Stonechat Saxicola maurus A common winter visitor throughout the whole of Thailand,
which we saw well on several occasions.
Pied Bushchat Saxicola caprata A common resident of northwestern Thailand, we observed a
few birds in farmland on Doi Lang and then a few more at a large wetland at Chiang Saen.
Grey Bushchat Saxicola ferreus A common winter visitor to the northern half of Thailand, where
we saw it well on many occasions.   

FANTAILS RHIPIDURIDAE
Yellow-bellied Fantail Rhipidura hypoxantha A locally common resident in northwestern
Thailand. We saw a few birds very well from the board-walk at the Summit Marsh, at the
top of Doi Inthanon National Park.
White-throated Fantail Rhipidura albicollis A common resident of mainly northwestern
Thailand, with scattered populations elsewhere further south. We saw it very well on
several occasions.
Pied Fantail Rhipidura javanica A common resident in eastern, central and peninsular Thailand.
We saw it very well on several occasions.

MONARCH FLYCATCHERS MONARCHIDAE
Black-naped Monarch Hypothymis azurea A common resident of western Thailand and a
common winter visitor to central and eastern Thailand. We enjoyed many good looks at this
attractive species, during our time in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Asian Paradise-Flycatcher Terpsiphone paradisi This species is a fairly common resident of
western Thailand and a fairly common winter visitor to central and eastern Thailand.
Unfortunately, this beautiful species was only observed by myself from the back of a pick-
up truck, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.

WHISTLERS and ALLIES PACHYCEPHALIDAE
Mangrove Whistler Pachycephala grisola An uncommon to locally common resident of coastal
mangroves. We saw a single bird very well, in the mangroves at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of
Siam.

BABBLERS TIMALIIDAE
White-crested Laughingthrush Garrulax leucolophus A common resident throughout much of
Thailand, we had sporadic glimpses of this bird throughout the tour.
Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush Garrulax monileger A common resident throughout much of
Thailand. We glimpsed a small party flying across the road ahead of us in Kaeng Krachen
National Park and fortunately, we had point blank looks at this species from the Lung Sin
Hide, near Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush Garrulax pectoralis A fairly common resident throughout
western Thailand. We glimpsed a small party flying across the road ahead of us in Kaeng
Krachen National Park and fortunately, we had point blank looks at this species from the
Lung Sin Hide, near Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Black-throated Laughingthrush Garrulax chinensis This species is a fairly common resident of
north west and central Thailand. We saw a single bird fairly well, while birding in Khao Yai
National Park.
White-browed Laughingthrush Garrulax sannio A locally common resident of one small area
on the Thai-Myanmar border. In this area it is a very skulking species, as it is hunted by the
local hill tribes, however, we saw it fairly well on a couple of occasions at Doi Ang Khang.
In sharp contrast, in large parts of its range in southern China, this species is very tame and
confiding, being easily found in parks and gardens, even in large cities.
Silver-eared Laughingthrush Garrulax melanostigma A recent split from Chestnut-crowned
Laughingthrush, we enjoyed many good sightings in the north west of Thailand.
Scarlet-faced Liocichla Liocichla ripponi A recent split from Red-faced Liocichla. This is a very
skulking species, and we were more than pleased to see it fairly well on Doi Ang Khang, on
the second day of the tour. However, it has now become quite tame at a feeding station on
Doi Lang, where it can be tempted into view, by putting bananas out for it!
Abbott's Babbler Malacocincla abbotti A common resident of the southern half of Thailand. We
saw this rather skulking species extremely well, from the Lung Sin Hide, near Kaeng
Krachen National Park. Lieutenant-Colonel J. R. Abbott (1811-1888) was Principal
Assistant Commissioner at Nimarr on the island of Ramree in the Arakan Province of
Burma (Myanmar) from 1837-1845. As a captain stationed on Ramree he discovered the
babbler.
Puff-throated Babbler Pellorneum ruficeps A common resident throughout much of Thailand, it
proved to be tame and confiding in Kaeng Krachen National Park, where we saw it very
well on a number of occasions.
Large Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus hypoleucos A fairly common resident throughout much
of Thailand, we saw a single bird very well on one occasion, from the Lung Sin Hide, near
Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Rusty-cheeked Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus erythrogenys A common resident of a small area
in northwestern Thailand. We enjoyed good looks at a single bird along the side of a track
on Doi Lang.
White-browed Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus schisticeps A common resident of western
Thailand, which we saw well on a few occasions.
Limestone Wren-Babbler Gypsophila crispifrons A locally common resident of limestone hill
country in northern Thailand. We specifically went to Wat Pra Phuttabaht Noi, a temple
precinct in limestone cast country. We very much enjoyed watching a family party
scrambling around and singing from the tops of limestone rocks.
Streaked Wren-Babbler Napothera brevicaudata A fairly common resident, with scattered
locations throughout Thailand. This species is an ultra skulker, therefore, we were very
pleased to watch it at point blank range, at a feeding station on Doi Ang Khang.
Pygmy Wren-Babbler Pnoepyga pusilla A locally common resident, mainly of northern
Thailand. This tiny species of wren-babbler is normally a very skulking species, and
therefore very difficult to see well. However, we got lucky on Doi Lang when we were
actually able to spy through the undergrowth a bird sitting motionless on a moss covered
log, in full song. We were more than pleased, yet more was to follow. While walking the
board-walk at the Summit Marsh, on the top of Doi Inthanon National Park, we came across
a second bird, also in full song, which was also singing from the top of a log, but this time, in full view, without any cover!
Rufous-fronted Babbler Stachyris rufifrons A common resident of western Thailand, we saw it
well on a couple of occasions in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Golden Babbler Stachyris chrysaea Patchily distributed throughout Thailand, where it is a fairly
common resident. We saw it very well on a few occasions while birding in Doi Inthanon
National Park.
Pin-striped Tit-Babbler Macronous gularis A common resident throughout much of Thailand,
we saw it well on a few occasions in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Chestnut-capped Babbler Timalia pileata A common resident throughout Thailand, with the
exception of the peninsular, where it does not occur at all. We saw a couple of birds very
well in farmland along the Kok River, at Thaton.
Yellow-eyed Babbler Chrysomma sinense A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
glimpsed one in farmland along the Kok River, at Thaton, and this was followed by a better
sighting a couple of days later, on Doi Lang.
Silver-eared Mesia Leiothrix argentauris This strikingly beautiful species is a fairly common
resident of north west Thailand, we saw it very well on many occasions.
Blyth's Shrike-Babbler Pteruthius aeralatus A recent split from White-browed Shrike-Babbler,
this species is a common resident throughout much of Thailand, which we saw very well on
many occasions.
Clicking Shrike-Babbler Pteruthius intermedius A recent split from Chestnut-fronted Shrike-
Babbler, this species is a fairly common resident of north west Thailand. We saw this
species well on a few occasions, during our time in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Collared Babbler Gampsorhynchus torquatus A recent split from White-hooded Babbler, this
species is an uncommon resident of north west and central Thailand. We saw a couple of
flocks fairly well, while birding in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Spectacled Barwing Actinodura ramsayi In Thailand this species as a very small range, in the far
north west, where it is a locally common resident. Fortunately, we saw it very well on
several occasions.
Blue-winged Minla Minla cyanouroptera A common resident of the north west, which we saw
well on very many occasions.
Chestnut-tailed Minla Minla strigula In Thailand, this attractive species only occurs on the
higher slopes of Doi Inthanon National Park, where it is a locally common resident, which
we saw very well on many occasions.
Rufous-winged Fulvetta Alcippe castaneceps This species also only occurs in north west
Thailand, where it is a common resident, we saw it well on several occasions, while birding
in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Brown-cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe poioicephala This rather drab species is a common resident of
western Thailand. Somewhat surprisingly, we only observed this species from the Lung Sin
Hide, near Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Grey-cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe morrisonia A common resident of Thailand's north west, which
we saw well on many occasions.
Rufous-backed Sibia Heterophasia annectens A common resident of Thailand's north west,
which we saw well on several occasions.
Dark-backed Sibia Heterophasia melanoleuca This species is also a common resident of the
north west, which we saw very well on many occasions.
Striated Yuhina Yuhina castaniceps Another common resident of the north west, we observed a
small flock very well on one occasion, in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Whiskered Yuhina Yuhina flavicollis A locally common resident of two small areas in north west
Thailand. We observed a small flock at close quarters, on one occasion, while birding on
Doi Lang.
White-bellied Erpornis Yuhina zantholeuca A common resident throughout much of Thailand,
we enjoyed a good sighting in Kaeng Krachen National Park, and this was followed by an
even better sighting in Khao Yai National Park.

PARROTBILLS PARADOXORNITHIDAE
Grey-headed Parrotbill Paradoxornis gularis This species is an uncommon resident of the north
west, we observed two small feeding flocks, during our time on Doi Lang.
Spot-breasted Parrotbill Paradoxornis guttaticollis This attractive species is an extremely local
and uncommon resident, which only occurs in Thailand, at Doi Ang Khang, right on the
border with Myanmar. Fortunately, we observed a single bird very well, on two consecutive days.

LONG-TAILED TITS AEGITHALIDAE
Black-throated Tit Aegithalos concinnus This diminutive but attractive species, only occurs in a
small area of north west Thailand, close to the Myanmar border. Fortunately, we found a
pair building a nest on Doi Lang, which enabled us to watch the birds at leisure.

CHICKADEES and TITS PARIDAE
Japanese Tit Parus minor A recent split from Great Tit, this species is a fairly common resident
of a few areas in northern Thailand, we saw it very well on a couple of occasions, while
birding at Doi Ang Khang, right next to the border with Myanmar.
Yellow-cheeked Tit Parus spilonotus A common resident of north west Thailand, we observed
this attractive species very well on a few occasions, on Doi Ang Khang and in Doi
Inthanon National Park.
Sultan Tit Melanochlora sultanea An uncommon, to locally common resident throughout much
of Thailand. This is a stunningly beautiful bird, which we saw very well in both Kaeng
Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks.

NUTHATCHES SITTIDAE
Chestnut-vented Nuthatch Sitta nagaensis A fairly common resident of Thailand's far north
west, we saw it exceptionally well on Doi Ang Khang and again on Doi Lang.
Velvet-fronted Nuthatch Sitta frontalis A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
enjoyed sightings on Doi Lang and in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Giant Nuthatch Sitta magna In Thailand, this magnificent species only occurs in a small area of
the north west, where it is a highly localised and uncommon resident. We needed a little
persistence, but in the end, we saw this species very well, during our time on Doi Lang.

CREEPERS CERTHIIDAE
Hume's Treecreeper Certhia manipurensis A recent split from Brown-throated Treecreeper, this
species is an uncommon resident of Thailand's north west. We observed this species very
well on Doi Lang and again, in Doi Inthanon National Park.

PENDULINE TITS REMIZIDAE
Fire-capped Tit Cephalopyrus flammiceps This species is a rare winter visitor to the extreme
north west of Thailand. We were very fortunate, to find a small family party sitting in a tree,
half way up Doi Lang.

SUNBIRDS and SPIDERHUNTERS NECTARINIIDAE
Ruby-cheeked Sunbird Chalcoparia singalensis A common resident throughout much of
Thailand, we only recorded this species on one occasion, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Van Hasselt's Sunbird Leptocoma brasiliana A recent split from Purple-throated Sunbird. In
Thailand this species is an uncommon resident of the Gulf of Siam and the peninsular. We
observed a bird very well in the grounds of our airport hotel, at Bangkok. And then had an
even better sighting of another bird in Khao Yai National Park. Dr. Johan Coenraad van
Hasselt (1797-1823) came to fame as the first person to find Mt. Pangrango in Java, in 1821.
Purple Sunbird Cinnyris asiaticus A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we saw it
very well at Chiang Saen and again in Dio Inthanon National Park.
Olive-backed Sunbird Cinnyris jugularis A common resident throughout the whole of Thailand,
which we saw well on many occasions. This is the only species of sunbird that occurs in
Australia!
Mrs Gould's Sunbird Aethopyga gouldiae This very attractive species is a fairly common winter
visitor to north west Thailand. We enjoyed very good sightings on Doi Lang and in Doi
Inthanon National Park. This beautiful species of sunbird was named by John Gould (1804-
1881) in honour of his artist wife Elizabeth, (1804-1841).
Green-tailed Sunbird Aethopyga nipalensis This attractive species only occurs in one small area
of north west Thailand and a slightly larger area on the peninsular. We enjoyed a few good
sightings on the higher slopes of Doi Inthanon National Park.
Black-throated Sunbird Aethopyga saturata A common resident throughout much of Thailand,
which we saw very well on a few occasions.
Streaked Spiderhunter Arachnothera magna A common resident of Thailand's north west, which
we saw well on a number of occasions.

FLOWERPECKERS DICAEIDAE
Thick-billed Flowerpecker Dicaeum agile A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
enjoyed a few good sightings, during our time in Khao Yai National Park.
Yellow-vented Flowerpecker Dicaeum chrysorrheum A fairly common resident throughout much
of Thailand, once again, we enjoyed a couple of good sightings, while in Khao Yai National
Park.
Plain Flowerpecker Dicaeum concolor A fairly common resident, mainly of north west Thailand
and a small area of central Thailand. We only saw a single bird, but fortunately, it was very
close and co-operative, while we were birding in Khao Yai National Park.
Fire-breasted Flowerpecker Dicaeum ignipectum A common resident throughout much of
Thailand, we saw the nominate race very well in Doi Inthanon National Park, and then we
saw an individual of the race cambodianum very well, in Khao Yai National Park.
Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker Dicaeum cruentatum This very attractive species is a common
resident throughout the whole of Thailand. We enjoyed good sightings of this species in
both Doi Inthanon and Khao Yai National Parks.

WHITE-EYES ZOSTEROPIDAE
Chestnut-flanked White-eye Zosterops erythropleurus A fairly common winter visitor to much
of Thailand. We observed a large feeding party, in a fruiting fig tree, in Khao Yai National
Park.
Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
watched a small flock on Doi Ang Khang and this was followed by a second flock, in Doi
Inthanon National Park.
Japanese White-eye Zosterops japonicus A common winter visitor to northern Thailand, we
found a small flock on Doi Ang Khang.

OLD WORLD ORIOLES ORIOLIDAE
Black-naped Oriole Oriolus chinensis A common winter visitor throughout the whole of
Thailand, we watched a migrating flock of a dozen or so birds, busily feeding, in Kaeng
Krachen National Park.
Slender-billed Oriole Oriolus tenuirostris A fairly common winter visitor to north west Thailand,
we enjoyed several good looks at this species, during our time on Doi Lang.
Black-hooded Oriole Oriolus xanthornus A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
saw a couple of birds very well, in Doi Inthanon National Park.
Maroon Oriole Oriolus traillii This very attractive species is a common resident in the north west
and an uncommon winter visitor around the Gulf of Siam. We enjoyed good sightings of
both males and females on Doi Ang Khang, and again, on Doi Lang.

FAIRY-BLUEBIRDS IRENIDAE
Asian Fairy-bluebird Irena puella A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
observed both males and females very well, in both Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National
Parks.

SHRIKES LANIIDAE
Brown Shrike Lanius cristatus A common winter visitor throughout the whole of Thailand, which
we saw well on numerous occasions.
Burmese Shrike Lanius collurioides A common winter visitor throughout Thailand, which we
saw well on a few occasions.
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we saw it
very well on Doi Ang Khang and on Doi Lang.
Grey-backed Shrike Lanius tephronotus An uncommon winter visitor to north west and central
Thailand. We saw a few birds very well on Doi Ang Khang and then we observed a single
bird in Khao Yai National Park.

HELMETSHRIKES and ALLIES PRIONOPIDAE
Large Woodshrike Tephrodornis gularis A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
saw a bird very well in Doi Inthanon National Park and this was followed by a second
sighting in Kaeng Krachen National Park.

DRONGOS DICRURIDAE
Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus The Black Drongo is a common resident, winter visitor and
passage migrant, which we observed on many days of the tour.
Ashy Drongo Dicrurus leucophaeus The common drongo of the forests of Thailand, it is both a
common resident and winter visitor, which we saw on numerous occasions.
Bronzed Drongo Dicrurus aeneus A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we saw it
well on many occasions.
Lesser Racket-tailed Drongo Dicrurus remifer Another common resident throughout much of
Thailand, and once again, we saw it very well on many occasions.
Hair-crested Drongo Dicrurus hottentottus This species of drongo is also a common resident and
winter visitor, to all but the peninsular of Thailand. We also saw it well on several occasions.
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo Dicrurus paradiseus This species is also a common resident
throughout much of Thailand, we saw it well on many occasions.

WOODSWALLOWS ARTAMIDAE
Ashy Woodswallow Artamus fuscus A common resident, to all, but peninsular Thailand. We
observed it on most days of the tour.

JAYS, MAGPIES and CROWS CORVIDAE
Eurasian Jay Garrulus glandarius A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
observed several birds at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Red-billed Blue Magpie Urocissa erythrorhyncha An uncommon to locally common resident. A
single bird flew across the road in front of our vehicle, close to the township of Mae Taeng,
and we saw it on a second occasion, at Sab Adao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Common Green Magpie Cissa chinensis A common resident throughout much of Thailand, we
saw it on a few occasions in both Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks.
Rufous Treepie Dendrocitta vagabunda This species is an uncommon to locally common
resident. We saw it well in the grounds of our lodge in Doi Inthanon National Park and then
we saw it a second time at Sab Sadao, in Thap Lan National Park.
Grey Treepie Dendrocitta formosae A common resident of north west Thailand, unfortunately,
we only glimpsed this species on one occasion, on the lower slopes of Doi Inthanon
National Park.

Racket-tailed Treepie Crypsirina temia A common resident throughout much of Thailand, which
we saw well on many occasions.
Eastern Jungle Crow Corvus Levaillantii A fairly recent split from Large-billed Crow, it is a
common resident throughout the whole of Thailand, which we saw on many occasions.

STARLINGS STURNIDAE
Golden-crested Myna Ampeliceps coronatus An uncommon resident of north west and central
Thailand. We saw a couple of pairs very well, while birding in Kaeng Krachen National
Park.
Common Hill Myna Gracula religiosa An uncommon to fairly common resident throughout
much of Thailand, we saw it very well in Khao Yai National Park and at Sab Sadao, in Thap
Lan National Park.
White-vented Myna Acridotheres grandis A very common resident throughout all but peninsular
Thailand, which we saw on almost every day of the tour.
Common Myna Acridotheres tristis Another very common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, which we also saw on almost every day of the tour.
Vinous-breasted Starling Acridotheres burmannicus An uncommon to locally common resident
of central Thailand. We enjoyed good looks at this attractive species, but only at Sab Sadao,
in Thap Lan National Park.
Black-collared Starling Gracupica nigricollis Another common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand. Another attractive species, which we saw well on several occasions.
Asian Pied Starling Gracupica contra A common resident throughout western Thailand, which
we saw well on many occasions.
Chestnut-tailed Starling Sturnia malabarica A common resident of north west Thailand and a
common winter visitor to the rest of the country, excluding the peninsular. We saw it well
on a number of occasions throughout the tour.

OLD WORLD SPARROWS PASSERIDAE
House Sparrow Passer domesticus A locally common resident throughout Thailand, we saw it
well on several occasions.
Plain-backed Sparrow Passer flaveolus A fairly common resident throughout the whole of
Thailand, which we saw well on several occasions.
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus An exceptionally common resident throughout the
whole of Thailand, which we saw on almost every day of the tour.

WEAVERS and ALLIES PLOCEIDAE
Streaked Weaver Ploceus manyar An uncommon resident of central Thailand, we found a small
breeding colony at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus A fairly common resident throughout Thailand, we saw small
numbers in farmland along the Kok River, at Thaton, and we also found small numbers at
Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.
Asian Golden Weaver Ploceus hypoxanthus A local and uncommon resident of central Thailand,
we found a small nesting colony at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.

WAXBILLS and ALLIES ESTRILDIDAE
Red Avadavat Amandava amandava An uncommon resident of the far north west of Thailand,
and along the Gulf of Siam. We observed a small flock at very close quarters, along the
Mekong River, close to Chiang Saen.
White-rumped Munia Lonchura striata A common resident throughout the north of Thailand,
somewhat surprisingly, we only observed a single bird in the grounds of our lodge at Khao Yai National Park.
Scaly-breasted Munia Lonchura punctulata A very common resident throughout Thailand, which
we saw well on many occasions.
Chestnut Munia Lonchura atricapilla A patchily distributed, uncommon resident, we observed
small numbers very well at a reed-fringed pond at Pak Thale, on the Gulf of Siam.  

SISKINS, CROSSBILLS and ALLIES FRINGILLIDAE
Common Rosefinch Carpodacus erythrinus A common winter visitor, mainly to the north west.
We found a large wintering flock on Doi Ang Khang, on the Myanmar border.
Spot-winged Grosbeak Mycerobas melanozanthos An uncommon resident of the extreme north
west of Thailand. We saw a couple of birds very well at Doi Ang Khang, at the border with
Myanmar.

BUNTINGS, SPARROWS, SEEDEATERS and ALLIES EMBERIZIDAE
Crested Bunting Melophus lathami A locally common winter visitor to north west Thailand. We
found a flock of half a dozen or so birds, which included an adult male, on Doi Lang.                                                     


MAMMALS


Northern Treeshrew Tupaia belangeri A diurnal, mainly terrestrial forest inhabiting mammal,
which we saw on many occasions throughout the tour.
Javan Pipistrelle Pipistrellus javanicus A very small species of bat, which inhabits primary hill forest. We saw a small number of these bats amongst literally thousands of Asian Wrinkle- lipped Bats on the edge of Khao Yai National Park.
Asian Wrinkle-lipped Bat Chaerephon plicatus We observed a large colony of this species,
which were roosting in a cave, in a large, densely packed colony, containing hundreds of
thousands of individuals. They began flying out of the cave at dusk, in dense flocks of many
thousands, forming intricate patterns in the sky and began foraging for insects high above
the ground. This all took place on the edge of Khao Yai National Park.
Banded Langur Presbytis femoralis A very uncommon and rarely observed, diurnal and arboreal
species of monkey. We were very fortunate to observe a single animal, sitting in a tree, in
Kaeng Krachen National Park. So little is known about this species that there is no reliable
information on the population numbers. However, it is definitely 'Endangered'.
Dusky Langur Trachypithecus obscurus This arboreal, forest inhabiting species of monkey,
proved to be quite common in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Long-tailed Macaque Macaca fascicularis As we drove to our hotel in the small town of
Phetchaburi, we found a large troop of Long-tailed Macaques, hanging around in the
suburbs. It is a common monkey of coastal forests, including mangroves.
Northern Pig-tailed Macaque Macaca leonina A forest inhabiting macaque, which forages
mainly on the ground. It proved to be common in Khao Yai National Park. This species is
considered `Vulnerable`, it has declined in recent decades due to degradation of habitat,
hunting, and trapping for the pet trade, or for use in climbing coconut trees.
White-handed Gibbon Hylobates lar Arboreal, rarely descending to the ground, it lives in family
groups with an adult male and female and up to three offspring. We very much enjoyed
watching such a family group, swinging through the trees in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
This species is considered `Endangered`, most populations have declined severely in recent
decades, due to loss of forest habitat and to hunting. Although significant numbers remain
in some protected areas, illegal hunting for food and trapping for the pet trade are both major
threats to this species.
Golden Jackal Canis aureus In Thailand the Golden Jackal is usually seen singularly or in pairs.
Groups often call at night, especially just after dusk and before dawn. A single animal ran
across the track ahead of our vehicle in day-light hours, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
This species is not globally at risk, but in southeast Asia it is poorly known and rarely
observed, it may only be an irregular visitor from China.
Crab-eating Mongoose Herpestes urva As the name suggests this mammal feeds on aquatic
animals, such as crabs, frogs, fish and molluscs. It can squirt a strong-smelling fluid from its anal glands, near the base of the tail, presumably for use in defence. A single animal ran
across the track in front of our vehicle, in day-light hours, in Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Asian Elephant Elephas maximus The Asian Elephant is mainly active, two hours prior to dawn,
through the night and up to two hours after dawn. We were very fortunate to have close
encounters with three, separate elephants during the tour. One in Kaeng Krachen National
Park, and two in Khao Yai National Park. This species is considered `Endangered`,
populations have declined dramatically throughout much of its range, because of illegal
hunting, as well as conflicts between humans and elephants in agricultural areas.
Lesser Mouse-Deer Tragulus kanchil This rarely observed mammal is active periodically, both
night and day. Its diet includes fallen fruit, leaf shoots and fungi. It is usually solitary. We
were very fortunate to enjoy very close looks at one of these mammals, just prior to dusk, at
the Lung Sin Hide, near Kaeng Krachen National Park.
Red Muntjac Muntiacus muntjac This family is mainly nocturnal, although it is also active during
the day, in areas where it is not hunted. It is largely solitary, except during the breeding
season. We observed a single animal of this species in Kaeng Krachen National Park and
then it became common in Khao Yai National Park.
Sambar Rusa unicolor Active mainly at night, but also early morning and late afternoon. Often
visits natural salt licks. Nocturnal activity and a solitary nature, is a direct consequence of
heavy hunting pressure. In national parks where it is not hunted, it forms small herds and is
active during the day. It was a common mammal in Khao Yai National Park. This species is considered `Near Threatened`, it has declined dramatically in many parts of its range,
especially Indochina, as a result of excessive hunting.
Black Giant Squirrel Ratufa bicolor This is a very large species of squirrel, which lives primarily
in the canopy of tall forest, rarely descending to the ground. It feeds mainly on fruits and
nuts, but has been known to take insects and small mammals. It proved common in both
Kaeng Krachen and Khao Yai National Parks. This species is considered `Near
Threatened,` although widespread, it has declined considerably in many areas due to loss
and fragmentation of tall forest, and hunting pressure, is also a contributing factor.
Grey-bellied Squirrel Callosciurus caniceps This was the common squirrel in Kaeng Krachen
National Park. It is diurnal and primarily arboreal.
Pallas's Squirrel Callosciurus erythraeus The common squirrel in the north of Thailand, it is both
diurnal and arboreal.
Variable Squirrel Callosciurus finlaysonii This beautiful and highly variable species of squirrel is
both diurnal and arboreal. We saw our first in the grounds of our airport hotel in Bangkok
and then it proved very common in Khao Yai National Park.
Western Striped Squirrel Tamiops mcclellandii Diurnal and arboreal. Its diet consists of fruit,
vegetable matter and some insects, it is mainly a mammal of hill forests, we saw it on very
many occasions throughout the tour.
Cambodian Striped Squirrel Tamiops rodolphil Also diurnal and arboreal, we saw it on one
occasion in Khao Yai National Park.                                                          

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